Jim Spanfeller Critiques the New Regulation Economy

Question: Will regulation do more harm than good?

 

Spanfeller:    The idea that more regulation as in anyway good for business is hard to imagine, you know, having said that, there are some, there are more than some that would suggest without more regulation if nor the place and our financial systems.  We’re going to have some tough issues going forward and I imagine that’s probably somewhat true, the issue was that with regulation and legislation it’s a blunt instrument, all right.  Alright, it’s not a scalpel, all right, it’s in there with you know, a steam shovel and as such… you know, there’s as much opportunity for harm as the risk for good so I guess I get worried about too much regulation, you know, and I guess I’ll take some refuge on the notion that you know, the Obama administration is just going to balance the budget by the end of the first term.  I’m a little hard press to see that’s it’s going to happen yet, given the spending that they’re working on right now and you know, spending around 3 or 4 major initiatives so, I get it why were increasing spending, not to lose of what your courses you know, is stimulating the economy, we can argue and debate in many will, the stimulus is the way to go for reinvigorating the economy.  The economy but you know, we’ll see if that works out.  But you know, I guess, when done it’s hard to imagine more regulation being good.

 

Question: What is one idea for the new economy you disagree with?

 

Spanfeller:    The idea that a certain amount of new cars will be mandated to work via fuels, when in fact I think the last set of research suggest that it’s more energy to produce and less efficient to produce a bio fuel than it is to simply use gasoline.  Now, having said that, in the side of that story would be yes but you know, personally technology will get better and better and better and at some point the efficiencies will be there and we’ll be reliant on diminishing resource and resource that we don’t have as a country that much controlled of.  So, but I don’t mean, I’m not the expert, I don’t… I really can’t weigh in on which side of that discussion is right.  What’s the old axiom, there’s your side, there’s my side and there’s the right side.

The CEO fears the one-size-fits-all nature of government regulation.

Photo by Martin Adams on Unsplash
Culture & Religion
She was walking down the forest path with a roll of white cloth in her hands. It was trailing behind her like a long veil.
Keep reading Show less

NASA finds water on sunlit moon surface for first time

Water may be far more abundant on the lunar surface than previously thought.

Credit: Helen_f via AdobeStock
Surprising Science
  • Scientists have long thought that water exists on the lunar surface, but it wasn't until 2018 that ice was first discovered on the moon.
  • A study published Monday used NASA's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy to confirm the presence of molecular water..
  • A second study suggests that shadowy regions on the lunar surface may also contain more ice than previously thought.
Keep reading Show less

AI reveals the Sahara actually has millions of trees

A study finds 1.8 billion trees and shrubs in the Sahara desert.

Credit: bassvdo/Shutterstock
Surprising Science
  • AI analysis of satellite images sees trees and shrubs where human eyes can't.
  • At the western edge of the Sahara is more significant vegetation than previously suspected.
  • Machine learning trained to recognize trees completed the detailed study in hours.
Keep reading Show less

Coffee and green tea may lower death risk for some adults

Tea and coffee have known health benefits, but now we know they can work together.


Credit: NIKOLAY OSMACHKO from Pexels
Surprising Science
  • A new study finds drinking large amounts of coffee and tea lowers the risk of death in some adults by nearly two thirds.
  • This is the first study to suggest the known benefits of these drinks are additive.
  • The findings are great, but only directly apply to certain people.
Keep reading Show less
Quantcast