Jean-Pierre Rosso on Transatlantic Relations

Question: What is the current state of transatlantic relations?

Jean-Pierre Rosso: Well, all depends on what level you place it. I think there is continuous there still is a great sharing of values between Europe and US, so the western world is still driven by the same, the same basic values and that, I think that will continue whether there is there are bumps on the road there will always be bumps on the road when, when one of the members is taking an action that does not have consensus, then obviously the, that is a bump on the road, but fundamentally I don’t see there have been many occasions where transatlantic alliance could have collapsed and it has not. So I don’t see, I don’t see that is happening alone.

Question: What actions could improve relations?

Jean-Pierre Rosso: Well, it is always a question of understanding the world as it is and being global citizens, I mean people have a hard time dealing with the fact that they are part of the nation, they are part of the world as well and that is what I call a global citizens, so the questions is, can you be a global citizen and still a country citizen and whether there is a conflict between those two, they can be at times, you know why, hopefully progressively this will change but this is a major dilemma because we go towards a more of a global governance  model, the world of nations will diminish as we see today in the European union for example which progressively.  Authority and autonomy is lost and transferred to a larger group of states, which I think pre figures the world of tomorrow. I think at some point we will have a global government, I wont see it, but maybe you will, but, there is some countries that are so nationalistic that they have a very hard time to do with that, but in the end, I think this trend is inevitable.

Question: Does the E.U. have a negative perception of the U.S.?

Jean-Pierre Rosso: In the EU, well, in some countries It varies by country, I think there is always been an admiration from the mental admiration for the history of the United States, but it has accomplished in 200 plus years and they but there is also, some may be some envy some jealousy the over powering media, culture that is so powerful around the world some times irritates people. But, and they are and then there are some differences and certainly the Iraq war was a major point of contention even we find that Europe was obviously against it and but see even that did not rupture the fundamental transatlantic Alliance, heard a little bit but, it is always get getting repaired. I think that there is just admiration and there is some irritation about when there is too much, imperialism or aggressiveness on the part of the US, in some instances, so whether it is military or cultural that always provokes some responses, but over all I think the admirations still it might if you draw a bottom line I think it is so positive, because the values the US have the democratic environment that the US place into they the role they play on technology and advancing new concepts is really a powerful thing, that is highly recognized.

Date Recorded: 03/19/2008

The U.S. is more admired than hated.

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