Is it dangerous not to use pesticides?

Marion Nestle:  Well I think anybody who has ever farmed is aware that there are pests.  And sometimes there are a lot of pests and they’re very hard to control.  And it isn’t that organic foods are produced without pesticides.  They are produced with pesticides.  It’s just that they’re ones that are less harmful to the environment.  They don’t last as long.  They’re biodegradable.  They’re not as toxic.  They’re not as harmful.  And that’s why the list of what’s allowed and what’s not allowed is so important and so deeply fought over.  I think what has been shown is that organic producers are able, with the tools they have available, to make their fields almost as productive – certainly within 10 percent of the productivity of conventional fields.  It’s done in a way that’s more labor intensive.  That’s why organic foods cost more.

Organic food is produced with pesticides, too, Nestle says.

Understand your own mind and goals via bullet journaling

Journaling can help you materialize your ambitions.

Videos
  • Organizing your thoughts can help you plan and achieve goals that might otherwise seen unobtainable.
  • The Bullet Journal method, in particular, can reduce clutter in your life by helping you visualize your future.
  • One way to view your journal might be less of a narrative and more of a timeline of decisions.
Keep reading Show less

How to split the USA into two countries: Red and Blue

Progressive America would be half as big, but twice as populated as its conservative twin.

Image: Dicken Schrader
Strange Maps
  • America's two political tribes have consolidated into 'red' and 'blue' nations, with seemingly irreconcilable differences.
  • Perhaps the best way to stop the infighting is to go for a divorce and give the two nations a country each
  • Based on the UN's partition plan for Israel/Palestine, this proposal provides territorial contiguity and sea access to both 'red' and 'blue' America
Keep reading Show less

Car culture and suburban sprawl create rifts in society, claims study

New research links urban planning and political polarization.

Pixabay
Politics & Current Affairs
  • Canadian researchers find that excessive reliance on cars changes political views.
  • Decades of car-centric urban planning normalized unsustainable lifestyles.
  • People who prefer personal comfort elect politicians who represent such views.
Keep reading Show less