We Were in the 'Dark Ages' of Understanding Infectious Disease — Until This Device Arrived

"We shouldn't be in the dark ages about knowing the health situation around us," says Kinsa founder Inder Singh. We mostly are in the dark ages, however, because medicine makers haven't focused on mapping the spread of disease, just stopping its biological causes.

Inder Singh:  Kinsa was founded with a mission to create the world's first real time map of human health to track and to stop the spread of disease. And the final sort of piece of the pie that came together is I met this brilliant technologist, this wonderful technologist who had done a whole bunch of really interesting things, not only in the software world but also in the hardware world and connecting the two creating a bunch of app enabled hardware products, toys, sensors. And he was similarly frustrated. He was a new parent and he was frustrated because every single time is child fell ill he would have to call the doctor or go to the doctor to simply understand what's going around. So he's similarly felt that we were just completely in the dark ages and we shouldn't be in the dark ages about knowing the health situation around us. And that's such an important and intimate aspects of our lives; we really need to make progress on it. So we came together and we started Kinsa.

I think it's absolutely critical that you know exactly what problem you're trying to attack. You need to understand the bounds of the scope. There's old adages that focus leads to success. I really, really believe that. You've got to focus on one really important thing. And to me the way to crystallize that focus is through a very simple problem statement. What are you trying to solve? So there's always going to be opportunities for you to expand your scope. I strongly suggest to many entrepreneurs don't expand your scope before you see success in trying to address the problem statement. In someway you achieve a few milestones, but they'll always be opportunities to expand your scope. I think being crystal clear about what problem you're trying to solve is also really beneficial for your culture as a company. We at Kinsa have people that span the gambit from medical backgrounds to big data backgrounds to software developers to hardware developers to people who have expertise in Chinese manufacturing facilities. Like it's very, very broad. So while our product sounds really simple, it cuts across many, many different areas, but one unifying theme, one thing that we're they're all together to do is to accomplish our mission; is to create this map of human health. And it's the stream of consciousness that allows us to communicate with each other and to join together and be really, really passionate about what we're doing and how we're using our skill set to contribute to the problem. So it's a great unifier for culture.

Inder Singh has devoted his life to finding innovative healthcare solutions for populations harmed by infectious diseases such as malaria. He served as the Executive Vice President of the Clinton Foundation's Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI), a global not-for-profit organization fighting malaria and other diseases. More than 2.6 million HIV/AIDS patients have received drugs subsidized through CHAI, and more than 30 million malaria patients have received drugs produced at lower cost thanks to CHAI licensing deals.


Singh is also the founder of Kinsa, whose mission is to create the world's first real-time map of human health to empower society with the information to track and stop the spread of disease. Kinsa gathers the data to map health using smartphone-connected sensors. It is produces an ultra-low-cost smartphone-connected thermometer. By combining a thermometer with a smartphone, Kinsa is "turns a thermometer into a communication device" with people who have just fallen ill. In addition to providing a temperature readout, this thermometer, marketed as the "world's smartest thermometer," tracks symptoms, enables one to get advice directly from a medical professional, and see the "health weather" in the local area to know whether flu or strep throat is circulating. Using the smartphone display and audio, it is also designed to ease taking a child's temperature by creating an engaging experience for both a child and parent.

What makes someone gay? Science is trying to get it straight.

Evolutionarily speaking, being gay is still something of an enigma

Videos
  • Heterosexual people have been less interesting to scientists than gay people, in terms of where they come from, because, evolutionarily speaking, being gay doesn't lead to a higher "higher reproductive fitness" — meaning, it doesn't lead to more babies.
  • Across cultures, gay boys tend to be more interested in spending time with their mothers.
  • We still don't really know why gay people are attracted to each other.

Study: Memories of music cannot be lost to Alzheimer's and dementia

The part of your brain responsible for ASMR catalogs music, and appears to be a stronghold against Alzheimer's and dementia.

The parts of the brain highlighted in red and yellow are thought to control your sense of attention and memory. (image c/o Brain Network Lab)
popular

Some music inspires you to move your feet, some inspires you to get out there and change the world. In any case, and to move hurriedly on to the point of this article, it's fair to say that music moves people in special ways. 

Keep reading Show less

Misbehaving: being clever and wicked is a form of creativity

Creativity can bring about unchecked harm, but it's up to us how we wield it.Aeon counter – do not remove

Mind & Brain

Suppose you forgot it was your partner's birthday, but you know that they would appreciate the smallest of gestures, say a bouquet. It's late at night and no florists are open. The cemetery on your way home has recently had a funeral, and you walk across the site and pick up a good-looking bouquet of roses from someone's grave. You then head home, and the flowers are happily received by your partner.

Would you say that you hurt anyone?

Keep reading Show less