How is technology changing the way we live?

 

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Question: How is technology changing the way we live?

 

Jason Kottke: One of the first things we discovered right after we . . . we had our son is that it’s really great living in New York City.  You can get groceries delivered or pretty much anything delivered, and you can all do it over the Web.  And so we’ll be up feeding him at 3:00 in the morning and I would be placing an order for, you know, FreshDirect to deliver groceries the next morning so we would actually have something to eat so that, you know, we wouldn’t have to drag our exhausted selves out to the grocery store even though it was only two blocks away.  But still it’s, you know, that sort of thing just sort of on a basic level.  And just things like, you know, my parents live, you know, more than 1,000 miles away.  And you know they can’t come visit every two or three weeks like I’m sure they would like.  I’m sure they would like to move in with us, you know, and be fulltime grandparents.  But you know the Internet just allows them to keep . . . to keep in touch a lot more and to, you know, see pictures of Ollie and videos of Ollie.  And you know we can do things like video chats.  And my dad, he travels all over the world, but he always has an Internet connection and he always checks in where he is.  And he’s like, “Oh, do you have any more pictures of Ollie?  You know I wanna see ‘em.”  And you know it’s really great for that stuff.

 

Recorded on: 10/9/07

 

 

 

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