How do you get the timing right?

Tanya Steel: I think timing for entertaining is kind of key, and that really is what makes or breaks people’s parties.  Because a frazzled host is not someone that you wanna be with or you wanna be.  So organization is key.  I’m just a huge proponent of organization in my life.  I’ve had to be, and it really does work.  So if you are gonna have a big dinner party, the night before I would set the table.  I would definitely have figured out what you could make that day or days beforehand.  You should have, you know, the wines chilling and anything that you can make a day ahead made ahead – sauces, breads, cakes, that kind of thing.  And then that morning, the morning of the party, I would just finish whatever it is that you need to do in terms of baking, and cooking, and roasting.  And you know grilling is a great way to entertain.  In fact that’s a kind of casual, relaxed way to entertain.  It’s delicious.  People love it.  It’s a way that’s very social.  Men love to grill.  In fact every man I meet I always tell him what a fantastic griller he is and a great pit master he is, and so they get a real kick out of it.  And so that’s a . . . another great thing to do when you’re entertaining, is to have grilled foods and build the party around the barbecue.

Timing can make or break a party, says Steel.

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