How do we fix the American political system?

Question: What's a practice we should stop in the common interest?

Harvey Mansfield: We should stop being so darn politically correct.  There are … this is especially the fault of the universities where I’ve spent my life.  And it doesn’t affect American society so much as the universities.  The universities are very important because that’s where our most educated people learn their principles.  We need to recover the obvious fact that there are two parties – at least – in this country, and two respectable points of view which should be represented in our conversations and debates?

Recorded on: 6/13/07

We should stop being so darn politically correct.

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