How to cultivate patience and tame your anger

If you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen. But if you're a Michelin Star chef with a restaurant to run, you're going to need a better coping strategy.

Eric Ripert: Kitchens are a very difficult environment. It’s hot, it’s many sharp objects everywhere, it’s a lot of people, it’s humid; it’s a dangerous place to be. And very often in a kitchen you have the cooks almost touching each other, there's not too much space, and that can create an environment that is potentially violent in a sense of screaming, and sometimes some cooks have tempers—and myself when I was younger, I had a temper—and can throw plates on the floor or pans, can express their frustration very easily.

I know that my generation of cooks very often fought violently in the kitchen or verbally abused in the kitchen, and that generation is working hard to make sure that we don’t have that anymore. But, of course, some chefs—and some of them are well known and they promote on television, for instance, that screaming is a good thing, and it’s not.

When I was very young I had a temper, and I think when you have a temper you always have it, but you can work on it and tame your temper, and that’s what I do. When I started in the kitchen, especially with the position of a chef, a chef de cuisine, I used to scream at the cooks, I used to break plates, be very angry. And when I discovered the philosophy of Buddhism it helped me tremendously to basically work on my temper and to have a different vision.

Buddhism has been very, very transformative for me. I meditate every day, on many different meditations. But I definitely try to avoid getting angry, so meditation is a big tool for me. What is interesting about Buddhism is that it’s a philosophy, it’s a religion, and also it’s a science. And personally it talks to me, it speaks to me. But I could be Jewish, I could be Muslim, I could be Christian or Hindu; all those major religions have the same mission to make us a better person, to make us better human beings.

So Buddhism is always interesting for me to speak about because I am a practitioner, but at the same time it doesn’t make me a better chef or better person than someone who’s not.

If you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen. But if that's not an option, you're going to need a better coping strategy. For Michelin Star chef Eric Ripert, discovering the philosophy of Buddhism and meditating daily transformed him from a raging, plate-smashing chef, to a calm and collected leader. The culinary industry is trying to rectify its reputation for workplace abuse and make kitchens a more mentally healthy environment to work in. For Ripert, the teachings of Buddhism inspired him to change the way he reacted to stress and frustration—but it's really just the framework: he recommends finding the philosophy that works for you and can guide you to become a better and more accountable person. Eric Ripert's most recent book is 32 Yolks: From My Mother's Table to Working the Line

LinkedIn meets Tinder in this mindful networking app

Swipe right to make the connections that could change your career.

Getty Images
Sponsored
Swipe right. Match. Meet over coffee or set up a call.

No, we aren't talking about Tinder. Introducing Shapr, a free app that helps people with synergistic professional goals and skill sets easily meet and collaborate.

Keep reading Show less

People who engage in fat-shaming tend to score high in this personality trait

A new study explores how certain personality traits affect individuals' attitudes on obesity in others.

Pixabay
Mind & Brain
  • The study compared personality traits and obesity views among more than 3,000 mothers.
  • The results showed that the personality traits neuroticism and extraversion are linked to more negative views and behaviors related to obesity.
  • People who scored high in conscientiousness are more likely to experience "fat phobia.
Keep reading Show less

4 anti-scientific beliefs and their damaging consequences

The rise of anti-scientific thinking and conspiracy is a concerning trend.

Moon Landing Apollo
popular
  • Fifty years later after one of the greatest achievements of mankind, there's a growing number of moon landing deniers. They are part of a larger trend of anti-scientific thinking.
  • Climate change, anti-vaccination and other assorted conspiratorial mindsets are a detriment and show a tangible impediment to fostering real progress or societal change.
  • All of these separate anti-scientific beliefs share a troubling root of intellectual dishonesty and ignorance.
Keep reading Show less

Reigning in brutality - how one man's outrage led to the Red Cross and the Geneva Conventions

The history of the Geneva Conventions tells us how the international community draws the line on brutality.

Napoleon III at the Battle of Solferino. Painting by Adolphe Yvon. 1861.
Politics & Current Affairs
  • Henry Dunant's work led to the Red Cross and conventions on treating prisoners humanely.
  • Four Geneva Conventions defined the rules for prisoners of war, torture, naval and medical personnel and more.
  • Amendments to the agreements reflect the modern world but have not been ratified by all countries.
Keep reading Show less