Health Risks

Question: What are the health risks of HGH?

Shaun Assael: Well you know if you believe the proponents of HGH, I mean I was in China not long ago talking with somebody affiliated with Gensai which is the biggest producer in the world, it has no side effects all it creates if you believe its proponents lean muscle mass makes you feel younger, gives you more energy there are those who feel an un persuaded by those who feel that is the biggest medical frauds since crystals that while it does in some respects create lean muscle mass and it does anecdotally the evidence is that it helps some what in post operative recovery, that it doesn’t help in a league performance and you need to take an conjuncture with testosterone to have any real build up where you do see it actually use for testosterone to some effect as in the elderly and in aids patients to reverse the effects of the wasting disease so it has some modest uses but it is funny when Andy Pat admitted to taking HGH and he said he took two doses and Endocrinologist told me that it is just nobody has any benefit with two doses.  You have to take two a day over the course of years so whatever it is side effects; besides the fact that this is all probably exaggerated; we don’t know; we have had 40 years of experience with anabolic steroids and only ten with this synthetic form of HGH.

I worry and I am not a doctor but I worry that if they can stimulate your Endocrine system then it might be able to stimulate the nine tumors. And there is some evidence of activity in the colon in that respect but again, I just think that were at beginning and it is proponents will suggest to you that it is the reason that we are all going to live a 120 years, there is a lot of hoax tourism out there.

 

Recorded on: March 18, 2008.

There are problems associated with enhancement drugs beyond just mood swings.

Related Articles
Playlists
Keep reading Show less

Five foods that increase your psychological well-being

These five main food groups are important for your brain's health and likely to boost the production of feel-good chemicals.

Mind & Brain

We all know eating “healthy” food is good for our physical health and can decrease our risk of developing diabetes, cancer, obesity and heart disease. What is not as well known is that eating healthy food is also good for our mental health and can decrease our risk of depression and anxiety.

Keep reading Show less

For the 99%, the lines are getting blurry

Infographics show the classes and anxieties in the supposedly classless U.S. economy.

What is the middle class now, anyway? (JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Politics & Current Affairs

For those of us who follow politics, we’re used to commentators referring to the President’s low approval rating as a surprise given the U.S.'s “booming” economy. This seeming disconnect, however, should really prompt us to reconsider the measurements by which we assess the health of an economy. With a robust U.S. stock market and GDP and low unemployment figures, it’s easy to see why some think all is well. But looking at real U.S. wages, which have remained stagnant—and have, thus, in effect gone down given rising costs from inflation—a very different picture emerges. For the 1%, the economy is booming. For the rest of us, it’s hard to even know where we stand. A recent study by Porch (a home-improvement company) of blue-collar vs. white-collar workers shows how traditional categories are becoming less distinct—the study references "new-collar" workers, who require technical certifications but not college degrees. And a set of recent infographics from CreditLoan capturing the thoughts of America’s middle class as defined by the Pew Research Center shows how confused we are.

Keep reading Show less