Has the Iraq War damaged America’s bargaining position?

Question: Has the Iraq War damaged America’s bargaining position?

Ted Sorensen: Our diplomatic power used to rely on our moral authority. It used to rely on our values, our principles, our active role in the United Nations and in the international courts, and in multi-lateral agreements in Europe and around the world. It used to rely on the humanitarian aid and the economic development aid – I have to put in a word there for the peace corps – in which America showed its best face and noblest instincts to the world. For the last seven years we have shown our ugliest face and our worst instincts to the world. We have shown the world that we’re a threat – that we’re relying on our military to get our way like a bully in the schoolyard. And so that moral authority is largely gone until a new administration tries to regain the respect that the United States had for so long until the Supreme Court, on a decision that they had no legal basis whatsoever, chose the President in this country against the wishes of the American people.

Question: What’s the best way to fix our image abroad?

Ted Sorensen: The best way to fix our image in the world is to elect a president who will show a different face to the world; who will immediately begin a different policy toward the world – not only a more peaceful, more lateral policy committed to justice and human rights instead of war, but also a policy that represents American values. We are still a great and generous country. There is still so much we have to show the world. A new president . . . And there’s only one in my view who can do that – Senator Obama . . . A new president can convince the world that this ugly chapter of the last seven and a half years is over at last. And that will require that president saying so to the United Nations, which the current administration has largely ignored or opposed. It will require that new president appointing ambassadors . . . not an ambassador to the UN who despises the UN such as Mr. Bush and Mr. Bolton, but ambassadors to all the world; doubling the size of the Peace Corps; doubling our humanitarian aid; being sincere and realistic about trying to stop the spread of HIV/AIDS in Africa. That’s good that we’re giving money. That’s fine. But we refuse to let the money be spent on condoms, which are essential to prevent the spread of AIDS in the rest of the world. So there are so many ways that we can demonstrate that yes, we want to help, not hurt the rest of the world.

 

 

 

Our diplomatic efforts used to depend on our moral authority, Sorensen says.

LinkedIn meets Tinder in this mindful networking app

Swipe right to make the connections that could change your career.

Getty Images
Sponsored
Swipe right. Match. Meet over coffee or set up a call.

No, we aren't talking about Tinder. Introducing Shapr, a free app that helps people with synergistic professional goals and skill sets easily meet and collaborate.

Keep reading Show less

People who engage in fat-shaming tend to score high in this personality trait

A new study explores how certain personality traits affect individuals' attitudes on obesity in others.

Pixabay
Mind & Brain
  • The study compared personality traits and obesity views among more than 3,000 mothers.
  • The results showed that the personality traits neuroticism and extraversion are linked to more negative views and behaviors related to obesity.
  • People who scored high in conscientiousness are more likely to experience "fat phobia.
Keep reading Show less

The most culturally chauvinist people in Europe? Greeks, new research suggests

Meanwhile, Spaniards are the least likely to say their culture is superior to others.

Image: Pew Research Center
Strange Maps
  • Survey by Pew Research Center shows great variation in chauvinism across Europe.
  • Eight most chauvinist countries are in the east, and include Russia.
  • British much more likely than French (and slightly more likely than Germans) to say their culture is "superior" to others.
Keep reading Show less

Reigning in brutality - how one man's outrage led to the Red Cross and the Geneva Conventions

The history of the Geneva Conventions tells us how the international community draws the line on brutality.

Napoleon III at the Battle of Solferino. Painting by Adolphe Yvon. 1861.
Politics & Current Affairs
  • Henry Dunant's work led to the Red Cross and conventions on treating prisoners humanely.
  • Four Geneva Conventions defined the rules for prisoners of war, torture, naval and medical personnel and more.
  • Amendments to the agreements reflect the modern world but have not been ratified by all countries.
Keep reading Show less