Globalization

David Dollar: I believe that globalization in general is good for developing countries. And as a short hand I think globalization is good for the poor. I think in this most recent era of globalization, you've got big countries like China opening up to foreign trade and foreign investment, and growing very quickly, creating a lot of jobs, and pulling a lot of people out of poverty in a very impressive way. China is the best example, but India is doing pretty well, and there are quite a few countries around the developing world that have gotten on this bandwagon of opening up the global trade and global investment. And I think that process of integration or globalization is really accelerating growth and bringing a lot of people out of poverty.

Recorded on: 7/3/07

Is globalization a good thing?

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Michael C. Crair et al, Science, 2021.
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Kondo and Okubo, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., 2021.
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Credit: Gerald Schömbs / Unsplash
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