Ezekiel Emanuel On Global Warming

Question: What is the problem?

Ezekiel Emanuel: Look. You can’t be conscious and not worry about global warming, and about what we’re doing to our planet, and about the use of resources. You also have to be really horrified about our inability in this country to tackle that problem. It’s not a . . . I mean there is a classic case of where we have the technology to solve the problem. We have the insight as to how to marshal that. If we let researchers go wild and support that, we would have a lot more technology. And yet we have not created the infrastructure, or the steady stream of funding, or the political will to actually do that. And that has to sour you on the notion of democracy. That fact that we can’t seem to address a very critical problem where we . . . Again, the issue isn’t so much, “Is this gonna pay off?” It’s gonna pay off hugely. The issue isn’t, “Do we have the technology?” We already have the technology to do this. The problem is we can’t seem to organize it. And that, for me, is a recurring theme in lots of problems. I mentioned it in relationship to the healthcare system. And I think that is something which really does bother me about the United States; that we can see the problems, we can have the ability to solve the problems; and we can’t seem to marshal the forces – social and political forces – to get it right.

Recorded on: 7/5/2007 at The Aspen Ideas Festival

The technology exists; the political will does not.

Scientists claim the Bible is written in code that predicts future events

The controversy around the Torah codes gets a new life.

Michael Drosnin
Surprising Science
  • Mathematicians claim to see a predictive pattern in the ancient Torah texts.
  • The code is revealed by a method found with special computer software.
  • Some events described by reading the code took place after the code was written.
Keep reading Show less

How to vaccinate the world’s most vulnerable? Build global partnerships.

Pfizer's partnerships strengthen their ability to deliver vaccines in developing countries.

Susan Silbermann, Global President of Pfizer Vaccines, looks on as a health care worker administers a vaccine in Rwanda. Photo: Courtesy of Pfizer.
Sponsored
  • Community healthcare workers face many challenges in their work, including often traveling far distances to see their clients
  • Pfizer is helping to drive the UN's sustainable development goals through partnerships.
  • Pfizer partnered with AMP and the World Health Organization to develop a training program for healthcare workers.
Keep reading Show less

Orangutans exhibit awareness of the past

Orangutans join humans and bees in a very exclusive club

(Eugene Sim/Shutterstock)
Surprising Science
  • Orangutan mothers wait to sound a danger alarm to avoid tipping off predators to their location
  • It took a couple of researchers crawling around the Sumatran jungle to discover the phenomenon
  • This ability may come from a common ancestor
Keep reading Show less