Do you have a creative process?

 

Question: Do you have a creative process?

 

David Chang: Creative processes for us are throwing whatever is gonna stick on the wall and seeing from there.  And from there it’s a progression of accidents to wherever we get.  

It’s funny.  I read some stuff, or people tell me, “Oh, you’re so clever with opening __________ Bar, or doing Noodle Bar,” or whatever.  They think there’s some big marketing scheme or PR plan behind it.  But no.

It was just a bundle of mistakes that happened, and it was, “Oh we can’t do that anymore.”  Or, “That’s a bad idea.” 

We tried to open up a fast food restaurant, and it sort of evolved into this crazy Asianish bistro that’s vaguely Asian if that. 

So the creative process for us is to be open to make mistakes.  And if you’re going to make a mistake, make a big one.  Be passionate about your ideas.  That’s the biggest thing.  And it’s true.  I do say that a lot. 

Everyone has to contribute and don’t be shy about it.  And even if it’s the wrong thing, or wrong idea, or something that’s creative that could take us in a bad direction, as long as you’re passionate about it, and you feel strongly about it, and there’s some logical reason why we’re doing it, then let’s do that.  I’d rather have that than to be stuck in these parameters where we can only do it this way. 

 

Question: Where do you get new recipe ideas?

 

David Chang:  Sometimes it’s not necessarily going to restaurants.  A lot of times I’d be thinking about something and well, I just finished a meal and now I can’t do this, this, and this because someone’s already doing it. 

Most of the time that happens when I go to WD-50.  Not that I could ever do that, but a lot of his ideas I’m like, “Fuck.”  Wiley’s done it.  Or I go to restaurants to find out what I can’t do. 

And the creative process is, a lot of times, the simple cheap meals.  

We go to Chinatown and that roast pork dish is delicious.  And it was a weird flavoring combination, so how are we going to replicate that? 

And it’s the stuff that we eat on a daily basis, whether that’s like how the poppy seed on that sesame seed bagel has that long aftertaste.  Like maybe that will parallel with a ___________ or something like that.  

That’s usually how it happens.  We’ll take an idea and we’ll try to run with it as far as we can.

 

"Creative processes for us are throwing whatever is gonna stick on the wall and seeing from there."

Videos
  • Prejudice is typically perpetrated against 'the other', i.e. a group outside our own.
  • But ageism is prejudice against ourselves — at least, the people we will (hopefully!) become.
  • Different generations needs to cooperate now more than ever to solve global problems.


Active ingredient in Roundup found in 95% of studied beers and wines

The controversial herbicide is everywhere, apparently.

(MsMaria/Shutterstock)
Surprising Science
  • U.S. PIRG tested 20 beers and wines, including organics, and found Roundup's active ingredient in almost all of them.
  • A jury on August 2018 awarded a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma victim $289 million in Roundup damages.
  • Bayer/Monsanto says Roundup is totally safe. Others disagree.
Keep reading Show less

Scientists see 'rarest event ever recorded' in search for dark matter

The team caught a glimpse of a process that takes 18,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 years.

Image source: Pixabay
Surprising Science
  • In Italy, a team of scientists is using a highly sophisticated detector to hunt for dark matter.
  • The team observed an ultra-rare particle interaction that reveals the half-life of a xenon-124 atom to be 18 sextillion years.
  • The half-life of a process is how long it takes for half of the radioactive nuclei present in a sample to decay.
Keep reading Show less