Dinner with Lou Gehrig and Babe Ruth

Question: If you could have dinner with anyone, who would it be?

Joseph Zuckerman: Let's see now, who would it be? Boy, that's a tough one. That's a tough one. Who would it be? I think I would have dinner with Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig. Just the three of us. I've read their biographies, multiple biographies on both. For some reason I find that era very interesting and I think it would be very interesting to be able to talk to two of the greatest legends in baseball. On the other hand, it may not be the most stimulating conversation.

 

The top joint replacement surgeon would like to break bread with two of baseball’s greats.

Godzilla and mushroom clouds: How the first postwar nuclear tests made it to the silver screen

The few seconds of nuclear explosion opening shots in Godzilla alone required more than 6.5 times the entire budget of the monster movie they ended up in.

Culture & Religion

As I sat in a darkened cinema in 1998, mesmerised and unnerved by the opening nuclear bomb explosions that framed the beginning of Roland Emmerich's Godzilla, it felt like I was watching the most expensive special effect in history.

Keep reading Show less

American imperialism: fat-shaming Uncle Sam

Opponents of 19th-century American imperialism were not above body-shaming the personification of the U.S. government.

Credit: Bill of Rights Institute / Public domain
Strange Maps
  • In the years before 1900, the United States was experiencing a spectacular spurt of growth.
  • Not everyone approved: many feared continued expansionism would lead to American imperialism.
  • To illustrate the threat, Uncle Sam was depicted as dangerously or comically fat.
Keep reading Show less

Dogs know when people are lying

A new study tested to what extent dogs can sense human deception.

Credit: Adobe Stock / kozorog
Surprising Science
  • A study of 260 dogs found that, in some cases, dogs can tell when people are lying.
  • The experiments involved giving dogs information about the location of food.
  • The majority of the dogs did not follow false suggestions when they knew humans were lying.
  • Keep reading Show less

    Why information is central to physics and the universe itself

    Information may not seem like something physical, yet it has become a central concern for physicists. A wonderful new book explores the importance of the "dataome" for the physical, biological, and human worlds.

    Credit: agsandrew via Adobe Stock
    13-8
    • The most important current topic in physics relates to a subject that hardly seems physical at all — information, which is central to thermodynamics and perhaps the universe itself.
    • The "dataome" is the way human beings have been externalizing information about ourselves and the world since we first began making paintings on cave walls.
    • The dataome is vast and growing everyday, sucking up an ever increasing share of the energy humans produce.
    Keep reading Show less
    Quantcast