Carol Gilligan on ‘Kyra’

Question: What inspired you to write Kyra?

Carol Gilligan: I was reading the New York Times book review one Sunday and there was a review of a new translation of the need virtual epic about a man whose mission is to found Rome, he leaves troy which is a disaster, this whole city is destroyed and then he found Rome, which is going to be an empire and destroy a lot more cities. So, that is an interesting like why would you leave troy and found Rome and it is always an interesting question. In the middle he goes to cartage and he falls in love with a woman who is a queen and who is building a new city and there is this idea of Oh! A different city that is not involved in war and destruction and empire that is involved in the arts and commerce and a man and woman would rule as equals, but no, no, no he has to leave her to fulfills hostage, that’s the old, old, old ethic from so long ago it should be out of date, but it’s of course. Anyway, I was reading this book review which was praising this new translation by Fits Jolder [phonetic] who is an exquisite and it’s zeroed in on the place where and he goes to the under world to look for his father and he meets Dida, who he startled to see, to realize that after he abruptly left her to fulfill his mission, she had killed herself and he says to her I couldn’t believe I would hurt you so terribly by going and I do not understand it was Sunday morning and I thought, how could a sensitive, intelligent man not no the effects of his action on someone who he really loved. He was deeply in love with, and then I thought how crazy for a women in that situation where you feel somebody is deeply connected with you and loves you and act as if there was no connection and I thought virtual was however many 100 years ago, I thought, but this is very in temper this story goes on and on. So, out of that came the characters Kyra and Andreas, she is in architect building sitting, he is carrying the household Gods, he is carrying from Europe of the 20th century and he is directing operas, he is a musician and theater director. So they need and they each had huge loses that are part of that history of, that is still going on. If people whose life’s have been shattered by political conflict in war, it goes on all the time. So, they are not planning to fall in love and the two of them fall in love with each other, because you can just see these two are going to be obviously attracted to each other. So, that how the novel starts and then, because I am writing about a contemporary woman, I mean she doesn’t commit suicide like virtual died out, but what happens when he leaves her is she does feel what has happen to her since behalf, so she goes in to, she is a modern woman, she goes in therapy, who holds second part of the novel and new characters Greta the therapist comes in, Andrea her friend who is an architect, anyway. I was not funny to write a novel and out of that came this novel Kyra which was amazing to write, because it took me in to just incredible worlds including the world of architecture.

Carol Gilligan says the inspiration for her novel goes back to one Sunday with the New York Times Book Review.

LinkedIn meets Tinder in this mindful networking app

Swipe right to make the connections that could change your career.

Getty Images
Sponsored
Swipe right. Match. Meet over coffee or set up a call.

No, we aren't talking about Tinder. Introducing Shapr, a free app that helps people with synergistic professional goals and skill sets easily meet and collaborate.

Keep reading Show less

Space toilets: How astronauts boldly go where few have gone before

A NASA astronomer explains how astronauts dispose of their, uh, dark matter.

Videos
  • When nature calls in micro-gravity, astronauts must answer. Space agencies have developed suction-based toilets – with a camera built in to ensure all the waste is contained before "flushing".
  • Yes, there have been floaters in space. The early days of space exploration were a learning curve!
  • Amazingly, you don't need gravity to digest food. Peristalsis, the process by which your throat and intestines squeeze themselves, actually moves food and water through your digestive system without gravity at all.
Keep reading Show less

Steven Pinker's 13 rules for writing better

The Harvard psychologist loves reading authors' rules for writing. Here are his own.

NEW YORK, NY - JULY 21: Steven Pinker speaks onstage during OZY Fest 2018 at Rumsey Playfield, Central Park on July 21, 2018 in New York City. (Photo by Brad Barket/Getty Images for Ozy Media)
Personal Growth
  • Steven Pinker is many things: linguist, psychologist, optimist, Harvard professor, and author.
  • When it comes to writing, he's a student and a teacher.
  • Here's are his 13 rules for writing better, more simply, and more clearly.
Keep reading Show less

Can the keto diet help treat depression? Here’s what the science says so far

A growing body of research shows promising signs that the keto diet might be able to improve mental health.

Public Domain
Mind & Brain
  • The keto diet is known to be an effective tool for weight loss, however its effects on mental health remain largely unclear.
  • Recent studies suggests that the keto diet might be an effective tool for treating depression, and clearing up so-called "brain fog," though scientists caution more research is necessary before it can be recommended as a treatment.
  • Any experiments with the keto diet are best done in conjunction with a doctor, considering some people face problems when transitioning to the low-carb diet.
Keep reading Show less