Can journalists be objective?

Question: Can journalists be objective?

Philippe Cayla: It's always difficult, of course to be sure, to be objective. The fact that our journalists are seven around the table guarantees, in some sense, objectivity. Because if one would put too much on his side, maybe it would be prevented by the others to do it. So it's some kind of guarantee. What I have observed in other medias is that being national, they have a national line. They have national kind of thinking. Our French competitors, and English competitors, and German competitors have their national way of thinking. And they try to approach their audience with this way of thinking. I don't say it's bad. I don't say it's … what we do. It's different. Our line is different from the others, let's say, in this way. We think there is no other broadcaster, no other news channel doing the same thing as we do. And that differentiates us from the others. There is also national. If you want to know what French think, watch a French national channel. What Germans think, watch a German national channel. And if you want to know what Arabs think, watch Al Jazeera in English, which exists already. But of course, in the course of time, you will be bored in getting only the story always from the same angle. So we try to take things from very various angles. We think it's our particularity. For the time being, I don't know of any other channel doing the same thing that we are doing. So I'm happy with that, and we make very good audience figures, by the way. We are very constantly improving our audience figures. And so for the first time, in June this year we overcame CNN International in Europe. We have now more than seven million viewers per week, which is ahead of CNN, BBC World, and all the other channels. So we are happy.

Recorded on: 7/2/07

 

Philippe Cayla of EuroNews say that the plurality of global viewpoints creates objectivity and, so, to get the big picture, viewers should consume news from multiple sources.

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