Bill Richardson: Is the American govenment too secretive?

Question: Is the American govenment too secretive?

Bill Richardson:

Yeah I do agree with that. I believe the government should be open. I think the worst example was when the Vice President said he wasn’t gonna submit to the scrutiny of Congress when they asked him for documents. And then outrageously he said that he was not gonna provide them ‘cause he wasn’t a member of the Executive branch. And I said to myself, “Well what is he, a farmer?” My point is when it comes to national security; when it comes to just simple information . . . I’ll give you an example. I got into a little trouble when I said at one of the debates that on UFOs, aliens, I don’t believe in them. But one of the problems that have been compounded about propagating this myth that aliens exist in Roswell, New Mexico is ‘cause the government has not provided full disclosure of incidents that happened years ago about possible landings in Roswell, New Mexico. And if they just released all the information, they wouldn’t have had this problem. Yeah I do believe in general that government is very secretive. It’s very bureaucratic. In many cases it turns people off. It’s very impersonal.

What I would do is I’d submit to unfettered town meetings with the American people. I’d have office hours where ordinary people would come to see me, as long as it was five minutes and they didn’t carry a weapon. (Chuckles) Actually I’ve done that as a governor. I would make the White House more part of the American family – make it more accessible. Obviously a President has to worry about security, but I would spend a night in people’s homes just trying to explain that government can be on the side of the American people. One of our big problems has been that the American people think that government simply is not on their side; that government is there to block progress; that government is there to make things more difficult, more bureaucratic. A lot of it is the tone of leadership that a President would bring.

Recorded on: 11/20/07

 

Open up Roswell's records, Richardson says.

​There are two kinds of failure – but only one is honorable

Malcolm Gladwell teaches "Get over yourself and get to work" for Big Think Edge.

Big Think Edge
  • Learn to recognize failure and know the big difference between panicking and choking.
  • At Big Think Edge, Malcolm Gladwell teaches how to check your inner critic and get clear on what failure is.
  • Subscribe to Big Think Edge before we launch on March 30 to get 20% off monthly and annual memberships.
Keep reading Show less

New alternative to Trump's wall would create jobs, renewable energy, and increase border security

A consortium of scientists and engineers have proposed that the U.S. and Mexico build a series of guarded solar, wind, natural gas and desalination facilities along the entirety of the border.

Credit: Purdue University photo/Jorge Castillo Quiñones
Politics & Current Affairs
  • The proposal was recently presented to several U.S. members of Congress.
  • The plan still calls for border security, considering all of the facilities along the border would be guarded and connected by physical barriers.
  • It's undoubtedly an expensive and complicated proposal, but the team argues that border regions are ideal spots for wind and solar energy, and that they could use the jobs and fresh water the energy park would create.
Keep reading Show less

Is this why time speeds up as we age?

We take fewer mental pictures per second.

(MPH Photos/giphy/yShutterstock/Big Think)
Mind & Brain
  • Recent memories run in our brains like sped-up old movies.
  • In childhood, we capture images in our memory much more quickly.
  • The complexities of grownup neural pathways are no match for the direct routes of young brains.
Keep reading Show less