Bill Richardson: If you were President, would you have called the Annapolis Conference?

Bill Richardson: Yes, but President Bush has waited seven years, and it may be too late. But it’s good to get people together in a room. I’ve always believed that you gotta negotiate your differences. Finally they invited Syria to participate, but much too late. I would have been talking to Syria earlier. But what is important is to realize that resolving the Israeli-Palestinian issue or making it less tense helps us try to deal with Iran, with the Iraq war. And what I believe is healthy is that if we can establish certain principles in the Middle East peace negotiations, like preserving Israel’s security; along with creating a Palestinian state; and then dealing with the outlines of the 67 borders; and then dealing also with the Jerusalem situation with the status of Palestinian refugees, but at the same time providing Israel a sense of security that it won’t be attacked, and that America will stand with our traditional relationship with it; and then you couple that with an effort by the United States to connect again with the Islamic world with many countries that are moderate Arabs, that are not jihadist terrorists. Because what we do need to do in our foreign policy is build international support against international terrorism, against those jihadists that do want to harm. My intensity in trying to bring a solution. My worry is in the Annapolis Conference that the President and Secretary Rice have said okay, these are the outlines, so you guys work it out. It’s not gonna happen unless America plays the role of honest broker; pushes both sides; builds coalitions; brings Syria in; brings Iran in; tries to resolve the Iraq war. But just getting back to the Israeli-Palestinian issue, the Annapolis Conference . . . my worry is that President Bush is gonna say okay, I’ve outlined the basis for peace. We’ve said that we’re gonna have a conclusion by 2008, and you guys are on your own. I would personally engage. I would spend my personal time. If I were President Bush, I would have been in Annapolis every second to try to find ways not just to produce a document that says our goal is to create peace, but to start looking at the potential outlines, ‘cause I believe there’s some potential areas of agreement there that if we can at least secure them early, you’re moving in the right direction and you’re lessening the tension. And you’re isolating the Hamaases and the terrorist elements that exist in the Middle East today.

Recorded on: 11/20/07

 

Bush waited seven years too many, Richardson says.

Why the ocean you know and love won’t exist in 50 years

Can sensitive coral reefs survive another human generation?

Videos
  • Coral reefs may not be able to survive another human decade because of the environmental stress we have placed on them, says author David Wallace-Wells. He posits that without meaningful changes to policies, the trend of them dying out, even in light of recent advances, will continue.
  • The World Wildlife Fund says that 60 percent of all vertebrate mammals have died since just 1970. On top of this, recent studies suggest that insect populations may have fallen by as much as 75 percent over the last few decades.
  • If it were not for our oceans, the planet would probably be already several degrees warmer than it is today due to the emissions we've expelled into the atmosphere.
Keep reading Show less
Image source: Topical Press Agency / Getty Images
Politics & Current Affairs
  • Though we know today that his policies eventually ended the Great Depression, FDR's election was seen as disastrous by some.
  • A group of wealthy bankers decided to take things into their own hands; they plotted a coup against FDR, hoping to install a fascist dictator in its stead.
  • Ultimately, the coup was brought to light by General Smedley Butler and squashed before it could get off the ground.
Keep reading Show less

Health care: Information tech must catch up to medical marvels

Michael Dowling, Northwell Health's CEO, believes we're entering the age of smart medicine.

Photo: Tom Werner / Getty Images
Sponsored by Northwell Health
  • The United States health care system has much room for improvement, and big tech may be laying the foundation for those improvements.
  • Technological progress in medicine is coming from two fronts: medical technology and information technology.
  • As information technology develops, patients will become active participants in their health care, and value-based care may become a reality.
Keep reading Show less