Bill Richardson: Are you running for Vice President?

Question:  Are you running for Vice President?

Bill Richardson: No. No. Why does everyone always ask me that? No. I don’t wanna be Vice President. I will return as governor of New Mexico if I don’t win. But I wanna tell you that I feel confident that I’m going to win eventually. It’s not gonna be an easy first strike. It’s gonna take several primaries. I love being a candidate. I love people. I believe I’m gonna get a good boost in Iowa and New Hampshire, and I’m gonna be on my way to the nomination. But no I don’t wanna be Vice President. I’ve been in Washington. I’ve had those honors before – UN Ambassador, Secretary of Energy. I love being governor. I’ve got three years to go. I’ve got so many things I wanna do in my state, too. Recorded on: 11/28/07

There's enough to do at home, says Richardson.

Why the U.S. and Belgium are culture buddies

The Inglehart-Welzel World Cultural map replaces geographic accuracy with closeness in terms of values.

Credit: World Values Survey, public domain.
Strange Maps
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Michael C. Crair et al, Science, 2021.
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Credit: Gerald Schömbs / Unsplash
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Kondo and Okubo, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., 2021.
Surprising Science
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