Becoming a Philosopher

Neiman:  I was a tail end of the ‘60s kid. I dropped out of high school as a matter of fact and- ‘cause I didn’t want to miss what was going on. I went on the road and did all the sorts of things that people did back then from Woodstock to the moratoriums against the Viet Nam War and it all collapsed pretty much at a certain point in this country anyway in ’72, ’73. And I don’t mean to say that I was theoretically caught up in the ‘60s. I wasn’t--  I was a kid. It’s not like I had seriously read Mancuso[ph?] or anything but it did seem time to think about what had gone wrong and where my life was going to go, and I just happened by good fortune or not to read a little Nietzsche and a little Sartre and I decided this is where the answers are; I want to become a philosopher. It was a long road from there to where I am now but that was what got me started.

Question: Who has influenced your life the most?

Neiman:  That’s a hard question to answer because I always considered myself lucky to have had just in philosophy five really powerful teachers, two in Berlin and three at Harvard, but not any one of them. I think if I had simply been influenced by one of them I would be less independent than I am now so there isn’t simply one person whom I can name. I was a student at Harvard of John Rawls, Stanley Cavell and Burton Dreben. In Berlin I was a student of Yackel Talbis[ph?] and Margarita Funbantano[ph?] who aren’t known over here but again I benefited tremendously by being able to be around almost a surfeit of first-rate minds and take bits from all of them.

Why Susan Neiman became a philosopher and who influenced her.

LinkedIn meets Tinder in this mindful networking app

Swipe right to make the connections that could change your career.

Getty Images
Sponsored
Swipe right. Match. Meet over coffee or set up a call.

No, we aren't talking about Tinder. Introducing Shapr, a free app that helps people with synergistic professional goals and skill sets easily meet and collaborate.

Keep reading Show less

In a first for humankind, China successfully sprouts a seed on the Moon

China's Chang'e 4 biosphere experiment marks a first for humankind.

Image source: CNSA
Surprising Science
  • China's Chang'e 4 lunar lander touched down on the far side of the moon on January 3.
  • In addition to a lunar rover, the lander carried a biosphere experiment that contains five sets of plants and some insects.
  • The experiment is designed to test how astronauts might someday grow plants in space to sustain long-term settlements.
Keep reading Show less

A world map of Virgin Mary apparitions

She met mere mortals with and without the Vatican's approval.

Strange Maps
  • For centuries, the Virgin Mary has appeared to the faithful, requesting devotion and promising comfort.
  • These maps show the geography of Marian apparitions – the handful approved by the Vatican, and many others.
  • Historically, Europe is where most apparitions have been reported, but the U.S. is pretty fertile ground too.
Keep reading Show less

Love in a time of migrants: on rethinking arranged marriages

Arranged marriages and Western romantic practices have more in common than we might think.

Culture & Religion

In his book In Praise of Love (2009), the French communist philosopher Alain Badiou attacks the notion of 'risk-free love', which he sees written in the commercial language of dating services that promise their customers 'love, without falling in love'.

Keep reading Show less