A Day in New York With Enrique Peñalosa

Question: What is your favorite part of New York?

Penalosa: Well, I love to ride my bicycle.  I have had a small apartment in New York, a very small apartment, and I will say that I go around my neighborhood by a bicycle.  I go through the village.  I go through the East Village. I go through China Town.  I like to go across the bridges by bicycle.  I love to take the beautiful Hudson River Park bicycle way and go all the way up to Riverside Park and then to all the way to Harlem to go riding around there, to ride around the city college campus up town and I don't know.

What is a particular place that I like?  Well, I like more of the area that I know more, which is all the area around the East Village and the -- all this area I enjoy.  There is a lot of life and a lot of people.  The Union Square area.

 

The former mayor of Bogotá and urban strategist describes his fondness for the East Village.

Lama Rod Owens – the price of the ticket to freedom

An ordained Lama in a Tibetan Buddhist lineage, Lama Rod grew up a queer, black male within the black Christian church in the American south. Navigating all of these intersecting, evolving identities has led him to a life's work based on compassion for self and others.

Think Again Podcasts
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For most of history, humans got smarter. That's now reversing.

We were gaining three IQ points per decade for many, many years. Now, that's going backward. Could this explain some of our choices lately?

The Flynn effect appears to be in retrograde. (Credit: Shutterstock/Big Think)
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There's a new study out of Norway that indicates our—well, technically, their—IQs are shrinking, to the tune of about seven IQ points per generation.

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Lateral thinking: The reason you’ve heard of Nintendo and Marvel

Here's why generalists triumph over specialists in the new era of innovation.

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  • One theory is that the rise of rapid communication technologies allowed the information created by specialists to be rapidly disseminated, meaning generalists can combine information across disciplines to invent something new.
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