Big Think and TEDMED and You

Big Think and TEDMED, the TED licensee for health and medicine, are collaborating on an upcoming series on how you can apply emerging ideas in health and science to your own life.

When we rang in the New Year and simultaneously celebrated our 5th year anniversary at Big Think, our resolution was to "Do Bigger" in 2013. What does that mean? As Big Think President Peter Hopkins recently explained:


We will take Big Think as you know it today and open our doors to go deeper and wider. We will continue to focus on big ideas, and then, help you put the ideas into practice.  Our aim is to answer the question, How can big ideas be turned into action?

Part of the answer to that question is the announcement we are making today, that Big Think and TEDMED, the TED licensee for health and medicine, are collaborating on an upcoming series on how you can apply emerging ideas in health and science to your own life.

Our aim at Big Think has always been to help you get smarter, faster. That involves introducing our readers to the big ideas that are defining our century, and transferring that knowledge as efficiently as possible. These days, we're taking that mission a step further. Through our soon-to-launch lifelong learning platform, Big Think: Mentor, we want to help you define or refine your personal and professional goals, and then help you develop the skills you'll need to reach them. 

The first co-branded Big Think and TEDMED series will aim to do just that, offering you lessons from experts in the field of personal health. Big Think will also co-curate special on-stage programming dedicated to transformers inside and outside the world of health and medicine at TEDMED 2013, the country's preeminent gathering in health and medicine that will be held from April 16-19th at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, DC.

We would be honored for you to join the Big Think delegation at TEDMED 2013, and in advance of this event, we invite you to contribute your ideas as well. Please lend your perspective by answering this question in the comments below:

"What is the most serious obstacle that needs to be overcome in order to ensure a healthy future?"

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