The Gaming Krib

Bud Hunt posted in Twitter about The Gaming Krib. Here's the basic premise of the service this company's trying to sell:


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  1. It has the ability to shut off families' electronic media (television, computer, cell phone, etc.). [I'm not clear how it does this]
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  3. Parents sign up for the service for their wayward children who'd rather play than do schoolwork.
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  5. If a kid tries to play a game or watch TV, he is told "Sorry, you cannot run game, go online, turn on TV, or use phone until math questions are answered."
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  7. Kid does math problems and earns time credits for use of electronic media.
  8. \n
  9. "Both parent and child happy."
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Check it out, particularly the endorsements (Daniel Pink saying "good luck" is an endorsement?). Also be sure to see the hilarious pictures for Steps 1–3 on the home page.

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I like the idea... but for adults. Sorry, Mom or Dad. Too bad that you had a tough day at the office today. You can earn 10–minute allotments of time to watch TV or use the phone, though. You just have to first do the dishes, scrub the toilet, clean out the garage, run your errands, wax the floor, fold the laundry...

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