How to rise above the war your government waged

You are not your government. An Iraqi is not theirs. Is it time to retune your perspective?

How does the world view American citizens? It might actually surprise you. Amaryllis Fox is a former CIA clandestine operative who grew up in the developing world and who has spent most of her career so far in foreign countries. "What continues to surprise me in every conversation I have, in each country I go to, is how sophisticated people are at separating the American citizen from the American government." You are not your government, just as an Iraqi is not theirs. That is a humanizing realization that is incredibly powerful for the everyday citizen, and even more so for veterans who have been trained in detachment, inside the military-industrial complex. Fox's organization Operation Zoe brings veterans back into their old theaters of war and uses their unique military skill set for humanitarian missions, like rebuilding homes, youth centers, and health clinics with local townspeople. "There’s a real magic to it when you recognize yourself in someone else," Fox says. Whether you grow up in an autocracy or a democracy, there is often very little say for citizens in the actions of their government. Your perspective on others and personal actions, however, are entirely in your hands.

Researchers Enhance Human Memory with Electrical Stimulation

Someday an implant may help the neurologically impaired overcome a damaged memory. 

 

Participant taking part in a memory study. Airman Magazine.

How good is your memory? It usually varies from person to person. This much is easily recognizable. But did you know that the sharpness of your memory can vary from one day to the next? Those who have had a stroke or a traumatic brain injury (TBI), often face memory impairment. They have limited options to overcome the problem and it hampers their quality of life significantly. 270,000 veterans and active military personnel are living with TBI, currently.

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New Research Suggests an Unlikely Treatment for PTSD: Antibiotics

There is a new era of PTSD science just around the corner.

 

US Army soldiers carry a wounded comrade injured in an Improvised Explosive Device (IED) blast during a patrol near Baraki Barak base in Logar Province, Afghanistan in 2012. (Photo Munir Uz Zaman/AFP/Getty Images)

With each passing day, the world provides us with grim reminders of a growing public health crisis. Society used to brush it off as a "case of the nerves", before labeling it as "shell shock", but today we know it as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

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