Driverless Cars Will be a Social Rather Than Technological Revolution

Driverless cars are nothing short of a revolution – not a technological revolution, but a social one, that will determine how fast we can accept, adapt and trust these new systems to change our lives.  

 

 

Driverless cars may be borne out of science fiction, but they are fast becoming realities on tomorrow's roadways. The transition from driver to robot is nothing short of a revolution. Not a technological revolution, but a social one, that will determine how fast we can accept, adapt and trust these new systems to change how and where we live, work, play and interact with each other. 

 

Japan's auto giant Nissan unveils the new robotic vehicle 'Pivo 2', equippeec with in-wheel electric motors to drive all wheels independently and to pivot its cabin at the company's headquarters in Tokyo. (Photo: YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP/Getty Images)

If you’ve sat in a new vehicle over the last decade, odds are that you’ve come into contact with a computer that assists in the act of driving. That assistance might have been as simple as a beep from the console that tells you when you’re about to back up into a light pole -- a mundane, accessory, maybe slightly annoying tool, not what anybody would put under the banner of science fiction. But that little beep is a harbinger for a coming revolution that will change the design of our cities and neighborhoods, our fundamental relationship with technology, and the way we work and live.

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Cars and traffic fill the A100 ring highway at dusk on November 3, 2014 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

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