What do we do with notorious sex offenders who make beloved art?

How do we reconcile American culture when an increasing amount of it is made by sex offenders? It's not a new phenomenon. Actress, author, and whistleblower Rose McGowan is here to tell you that American culture has been screwed up for a long, long time.

Actress, author, and whistleblower Rose McGowan is here to tell you that American culture has been screwed up for a long, long time. She wonders how our society can defend a culture that embraces sexual deviants (see: Woody Allen, Louis C.K.) and clearly racist imagery (see: the Washington Redskins name and logo). She muses, too, on why American culture seems to be so bent on putting complex and thoughtful women second place to the likes of, as she puts it, a "slovenly slob" like Adam Sandler. Women deserve better, she posits. And we're absolutely inclined to agree. Rose McGowan's new book is aptly titled BRAVE.

If we're going to confront sexual abuse, we must confront abusers

Feminist, author, and whistle-blower Rose McGowan joins us for a wide-ranging talk about the myths behind sexual abuse and why it's never O.K. to label someone with loaded words.

It's hard to put a bio of Rose McGowan into one sentence. She is one of the whistle-blowers behind the anti-sexual-harassment movement sweeping the nation, and she is also one of the most visible voices of the #METOO / #TIMESUP movements. Rose McGowan is part people's champion, part feminist orator, and, in our wide-ranging interview with her (of which is this part 1 of several), she is part cool-aunt that gives you incredibly solid life advice. Here, she talks with us about the myths behind sexual abuse. It's not just a women's issue, she says, it's a people issue. And certain kinds of people seem to propagate the idea that it's somehow O.K. to put other people into boxes. She posits this is part of the abusive cycle, and that it doesn't have to be that way. Her marvelous new book is appropriately titled BRAVE.