How a Hackneyed Romantic Ideal Is Used to Stigmatise Polyamory

Perhaps you’re thinking you don’t know any non-monogamous people. But I wouldn’t be too sure.

Young people stand next to a fence decorated with so-called 'Liebesschloesser' (love padlocks) at the Hohenzollernbruecke bridge in Cologne, Germany. Photo credit: PATRIK STOLLARZ/AFP/Getty Images

There’s no longer anything unusual about wanting an open relationship. Many who consider themselves progressive about sex, gender, love and relationships know this. It’s just that almost nobody in an open relationship wants to be open about it. What’s surprising is that so many people feel the need for secrecy.

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The Most Debilitating Disease in the World Isn't Just in Your Head

For the first time, the World Health Organization has declared a new mental illness to be the leading cause of disability around the world.

 

Depression. Photo Diego Fornero [flickr.com/destino2003]

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Antidepressants: Why the ‘Overmedicated America’ Narrative Is Harmful

We're in an epidemic of mental illness and in an epidemic of misinformation about mental illness. The myth that America is "overmedicated" regarding antidepressants only furthers the stigma that stops people from seeking help.

Big Pharma has got itself a bad, bad name. Many people become nervous at the mention of pharmaceutical intervention for mental illness, but there's another solution that may bring ease to some: it's called little farmer, quips psychiatrist Drew Ramsey. For how food can control conditions like anxiety and depression, look through Ramsey's previous videos on Big Think. But here, Ramsey wants to address the popular notion that America is overprescribed. "I always like to point out that the ten percent of Americans who take antidepressants in the morning, they do that voluntarily because it's something that helps them." In his 16 years of psychiatric practice, Ramsey has more often seen mis-prescription rather than overprescription. But at least mis-prescribed people are on the path to finding the right treatment – much worse is the people who aren't getting any help at all whether it be diet, or therapy, or pharmaceuticals. Psychiatric medication isn't right for everyone, but in many cases it truly saves lives, says Ramsey. If we continue to propagate the over-prescription myth for this kind of medication (opiates are another issue), it may alienate those who need help from seeking it at all. Stigma doesn't help in the effort to reduce severe life disruption and suicide, which for the latter totaled 42,773 Americans in 2014, a steep rise from 29,199 people in 1999. Drew Ramsey's book is Eat Complete: The 21 Nutrients That Fuel Brainpower, Boost Weight Loss, and Transform Your Health.

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Is Our Celebrity Obsession Helping to De-Stigmatize Mental Illness?

A rash of teen idols, singers, actors, and actresses have all come out recently detailing their struggles. 

 

Actress, singer, and songwriter Demi Lovato is now a mental healthcare advocate.

Few things in our society are stigmatized quite like mental illness. Most people try to hide it or manage it on their own. Few seek help. But it is exceedingly common. Nearly one in five Americans – 42.5 million adults – wrestles with it. Worldwide one in four, or 450 million people, suffer with some sort of psychological issue.  

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