The power of group identity: 22 percent of Americans remain skeptical of vaccines

According to this research, eight percent of Americans always refuse vaccines. Why?

Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP via Getty Images
  • New research found that 22 percent of Americans identify as somewhat or fully resistant to vaccination.
  • Researchers used two social psychology theories to explore the causes of vaccine resistance.
  • The more one identifies with an anti-vaccine group, the harder it is to dissuade them from their ideas.
Keep reading Show less

Studies likely to be wrong have 153 more citations

Science journals may be lowering their standards to publish studies with eye-grabbing — but probably incorrect — results.

  • Science is facing a replication crisis, namely, that many studies published in top journals fail to replicate.
  • A new study examined the citation count of "failed" studies, finding that these nonreplicable studies accumulated 153 more citations than more reliable research, even after they are shown to be nonreplicable.
  • The study suggests the replication crisis might be driven, in part, by incentives that encourage researchers to generate "interesting" results.
Keep reading Show less

How WallStreetBets “hype” spreads among investors like a virus

A new study explores how investors' behavior is affected by participating in online communities, like Reddit's WallStreetBets.

Rafael Henrique via Adobe Stock
  • The study found evidence that "hype" over assets is psychologically contagious among investors in online communities.
  • This hype is self-perpetuating: A small group of investors hypes an asset, bringing in new investors, until growth becomes unsteady and a price crash ensues.
  • The researchers suggested that these new kinds of self-organized, social media-driven investment behaviors are unlikely to disappear anytime soon.
Keep reading Show less

The science behind ‘us vs. them’

Humans may have evolved to be tribalistic. Is that a bad thing?

  • From politics to every day life, humans have a tendency to form social groups that are defined in part by how they differ from other groups.
  • Neuroendocrinologist Robert Sapolsky, author Dan Shapiro, and others explore the ways that tribalism functions in society, and discuss how—as social creatures—humans have evolved for bias.
  • But bias is not inherently bad. The key to seeing things differently, according to Beau Lotto, is to "embody the fact" that everything is grounded in assumptions, to identify those assumptions, and then to question them.
Photo by AJ Colores on Unsplash
Why do some people fight and others flee when confronting violence?
Keep reading Show less
Quantcast