Why Amartya Sen remains the century’s great critic of capitalism

Societies aren't just engines of prosperity.

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Critiques of capitalism come in two varieties. First, there is the moral or spiritual critique.
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Are mental health disorders ever purely biological?

Two anthropologists question the chemical imbalance theory of mental health disorders.

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  • Two physical anthropologists argue that you cannot pin most mental health disorders on brain chemistry alone.
  • As antidepressants will soon be a $16B industry, the chemical imbalance theory suits business interests better than health interests.
  • An etiology of depression should include behavioral observation, cross-population comparisons, cultural transmission, and evolutionary theory.
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How QAnon is monetizing child trafficking victims

What good is a conspiracy theory you can't profit from?

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  • With over 2,000 items on Amazon and 6,600 items on Etsy, QAnon-related swag is now a big industry.
  • Many top QAnon devotees are using this conspiracy theory to promote supplements, t-shirts, and pendants.
  • This baseless theory is doing more harm than good to the child victims it purports to help.
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How should we study sex differences in a polarized age?

A new study on brain differences between sexes sparks a persistent question.

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  • A new study found brain volume differences between men and women.
  • The research focuses on regional grey matter volume, a contentious measurement in neuroscience.
  • Without environmental conditions being considered, how trustworthy is our emphasis on biology?
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Like it or not, you can't ignore how people look or sound

A new study from Ohio State University details implicit bias.

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  • New research from Ohio State claims we cannot separate how someone looks and sounds.
  • Volunteers were asked to look at photos and listen to audio, and were told to ignore their face or voice.
  • "They were unable to entirely eliminate the irrelevant information," said associate professor Kathryn Campbell-Kibler.
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