38% of European Jews have considered emigrating due to recent anti-Semitism, E.U. reports

Jewish people living in nearly all European countries report that anti-Semitism has grown in recent years.

People light candles on November 8, 2018 at the site of a former synagogue in Schwerin as Germany marks the 80th anniversary of the 'Night of Broken Glass' (Kristallnacht), when Nazi thugs torched synagogues, smashed Jewish-owned shops and rounded up Jewish men across Germany on November 9, 1938. (Photo by Bernd WUESTNECK / dpa / AFP) / Germany OUT (Photo credit should read BERND WUESTNECK/AFP/Getty Images)
  • The survey is based on responses from 16,395 Jewish people living in 12 European countries.
  • 1 in 4 reported having experienced anti-Semitic harassment over the past 12 months.
  • E.U. officials urged governments to do more to combat anti-Semitism, including the promotion of Holocaust education.
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Cutting social media use to 30 mins per day significantly reduces depression and loneliness

Who would have thought that endlessly comparing your life to others would make you feel bad?

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  • Prior research has shown that social media usage can negatively impact our mental health, but until now, very few studies have shown this experimentally.
  • A study from the University of Pennsylvania asked study participants to limit their social media usage so their resulting mental health could be measured.
  • The results tell us how to regulate our social media usage to improve our well-being.
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How the marketplace of ideas went rogue

Opinion ruined journalism and Facebook killed truth—but there's a way to make it right.

  • The marketplace of ideas is a better metaphor than it's intended to be, notes Eli Pariser. As any good economist will tell you, the best product doesn't always rise to the top.
  • The institutional gatekeepers and experts who once kept checks and balances on the marketplace of ideas have been replaced by social media algorithms that reward emotion and outrage over expertise and truth.
  • How can media institutions like Facebook make this right? By reevaluating the business model that serves advertisers instead of readers, and by clearly stating their values—even if that means losing some of those 2 billion users.

The Charles Koch Foundation is committed to understanding what drives intolerance and the best ways to cure it. The foundation supports interdisciplinary research to overcome intolerance, new models for peaceful interactions, and experiments that can heal fractured communities. For more information, visit charleskochfoundation.org/courageous-collaborations. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Charles Koch Foundation, which encourages the expression of diverse viewpoints within a culture of civil discourse and mutual respect.

If you have this condition, you’re more likely to believe “pseudo-profound bullsh*t"

Researchers find out why some people believe utter BS.

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  • Scientists discover that people who have high apophenia are more likely to believe "pseudo-profound bullshit".
  • Apophenia is a tendency to see patterns and connections that aren't really there.
  • The condition could be a precursor to more serious mental illness.
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NYTimes exposé reveals how Facebook handled scandals

Delay, deny and deflect were the strategies Facebook has used to navigate scandals it's faced in recent years, according to the New York Times.

(Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
  • The exhaustive report is based on interviews with more than 50 people with ties to the company.
  • It outlines how senior executives misled the public and lawmakers in regards to what it had discovered about privacy breaches and Russian interference in U.S. politics.
  • On Thursday, Facebook cut ties with one of the companies, Definers Public Relations, listed in the report.
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