Past victories don't always translate to success in new environments. Here's why.

Researchers at the Rotman School of Management discovered that past victories rarely translate into new environments.

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - FEBRUARY 07: Former Uber CEO Travis Kalanick leaves the Phillip Burton Federal Building on day three of the trial between Waymo and Uber Technologies on February 7, 2018 in San Francisco, California. Waymo, an autonomous car subsidiary owned by Google's parent company Alphabet, has accused Uber of theft of trade secrets on its self-driving vehicle development by alleging former Waymo employee Anthony Levandowski illegally downloaded 14,000 confidential documents before leaving to start his own self-driving car company, Otto, which Uber acquired shortly after for a reported $680 million. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
  • Ineffective leaders mistakenly expect past victories to translate into new situations.
  • By forcing their previous culture into new environments, they create ineffective cultures.
  • Canadian researchers suggest that leaders need to treat their current role as it is, not as it's been previously.
Keep reading Show less

Actually, the Customer Is Not Always Right

This will be music to the ears of anyone who's ever worked in customer service. Is this old managerial adage doing companies more harm than good?

The tired, old adage many businesses run by is that "the customer is always right", but Simon Sinek is here to tell us we’ve got it all wrong. All companies must make and increase profits to survive, but what’s missing is the understanding of it as a linear process. Rather than staring at the end goal, it literally pays to see it as a chain effect. When managers put their employees first, employees are empowered to deliver the ideal customer service a top company would strives for. Through an anecdote about one service industry worker who is employed at two differently run establishments, Sinek illuminates how the best managerial method is to prioritize the wellbeing of employees first. Simon Sinek's most recent book is Start With Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action.

Keep reading Show less

Are You a Visionary – or a Follower? Here's How to Step Up

Visionaries know why they get out of bed each day. Do you? Ethnographer and leadership expert Simon Sinek explains how to find direction and fulfillment in your personal and professional life.

Do you know why you get out of bed in the morning? According Simon Sinek (ethnographer, leadership expert, and the official mascot for optimism), answering "because I have to" isn’t quite cutting the mustard.

Keep reading Show less