Scientists claim the Bible is written in code that predicts future events

The controversy around the Torah codes gets a new life.

Michael Drosnin
  • Mathematicians claim to see a predictive pattern in the ancient Torah texts.
  • The code is revealed by a method found with special computer software.
  • Some events described by reading the code took place after the code was written.
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Archaeologists unearth dozens of mummified cats in Egypt

Dozens of mummified cats were dug up this week. This isn't as shocking as you might think.

KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/Getty Images
  • Archaeologists in Egypt have found dozens of mummified cats in the tomb of a royal offical.
  • The cats will join the ranks of hundreds of thousands of previously discovered ancient kitties.
  • While the cats are nothing special, the tomb also held well preserved beetles.
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Germany denies Pastafarians religious rights

All the prayers in the world to the Flying Spaghetti Monster probably won't help.

(Public Domain)
  • The Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster has been denied the rights of a religion in Germany.
  • Church members were seeking permission to erect public signage.
  • Are views of opposition expressed as satire less valid than the ideas they oppose?
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Life as a skeptic is summed up in this parody documentary

This parody documentary skewers both the skeptic and the superstitious, and accurately shows what issues skeptics face.

  • A video from QED 2018 has made the rounds on the internet, poking fun at skeptics and the credulous alike.
  • It features a nearly perfect impression of Sir David Attenborough, jabs at peddlers of pseudoscience, and sharp British humor.
  • The clip reminds us that while it can be difficult to be a skeptic in a superstitious world we must take a moment to laugh at these difficulties.
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Why Japan's Buddhists run a deadly 1,000-day marathon

Only 46 monks have completed the seven-year marathon since 1885.

Photo by Yuya Shino/Getty Images
  • The kaihōgyō — a seven-year, 1,000-day marathon — is among the world's most difficult physical challenges.
  • It is rarely completed, and those who fail are historically expected to kill themselves.
  • Why do Japan's Buddhist monks take on this nearly impossible challenge?
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