How getting in sync with your partner can lead to increased intimacy and sexual desire

Researchers discover a link between nonverbal synchronization and relationship success.

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  • Scientists say coordinating movements leads to increased intimacy and sexual desire in a couple.
  • The improved rapport and empathy was also observed in people who didn't know each other.
  • Non-verbal clues are very important in the development stages of a relationship.
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What happens when you learn how much your coworkers make?

New research shows that the answer is more subtle than you might think.

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  • The debate on whether to be transparent about our salaries has been going on for decades.
  • New research shows that depending on whether we share our salaries vertically (from boss to employee) or horizontally (between equal peers), we can expect different effects in our productivity and motivation.
  • Millennials are more likely to share salary information than previous generations. What effect will this have on the workplace?
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Study: The effects of online trolling on authors, publications

A study started out trying to see the effect of sexist attacks on women authors, but it found something deeper.

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  • It's well known that abusive comments online happen to women more than men
  • Such comments caused a "significant effect for the abusive comment on author credibility and intention to seek news from the author and outlet in the future"
  • Some news organizations already heavily moderate or even ban comments entirely; this should underscore that effort
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Study: young men obsessed with building muscles have higher mental health risks

They're at a higher risk for depression, weekend binge drinking, and unnecessary dieting.

Palestinian participants flex their muscles during a bodybuilding competition in Gaza city on October 28, 2016. / AFP / MOHAMMED ABED (Photo credit should read MOHAMMED ABED/AFP/Getty Images)
  • Body dysmorphia is not limited to women, a new study from Norway and Cambridge shows.
  • Young men that focus on building muscle are at risk for a host of mental and physical health problems.
  • Selfie culture is not helping the growing number of teens that are anxious and depressed.
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The one easy trick that will sharpen your decision-making

It's been used by everyone from philosophers to business leaders — and Stanford research shows it really makes a difference.

Photo by Bethany Legg on Unsplash

Every month, the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton Executive Education and Wharton's Center for Leadership and Change Management come together to release a "nano tool" that hones in on small changes you can make to improve your performance and leadership abilities. Their September suggestion highlights the positive impact — and widespread usage amongst successful people — of walking while making difficult decisions or thinking through complex problems.

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