Five weird thought experiments to break your brain

Thought expriments are great tools, but do they always do what we want them to?

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  • Thought experiments are quite popular, though some get more time in the sun than others.
  • While they are supposed to help guide our intuition to help solve difficult problems, some are a bit removed from reality.
  • Can we trust the intuitions we have about problems set in sci-fi worlds or that postulate impossible monsters?
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Say yes to the world: On Nietzsche and affirmation

Can we affirm everything in life, the beauty and the suffering? Nietzsche says yes.

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There cannot be any comparable sentence in the history of Western thought.

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The philosophy of bullsh*t and how to avoid stepping in it

A philosopher's guide to detecting nonsense and getting around it.

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  • A professor in Sweden has a bold on idea on what BS, pseudoscience, and pseudophilosophy actually are.
  • He suggests they are defined by a lack of "epistemic conscientiousness" rather than merely being false.
  • He offers suggestions on how to avoid producing nonsense and how to identify it on sight.
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New research reveals what it's like to inhabit someone else's body

You actually score worse on memory tests.

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  • The idea of inhabiting someone else's body can be found in some of humanity's earliest mythologies.
  • A team at Sweden's Karolinska Institutet conducted a body-switching experiment with 33 pairs of friends.
  • The findings could have profound clinical implications down the road, such as in depression treatment.
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Three thinkers on when we should call out harmful speech

What speech is harmful, how do we know, and what do we do if we find out?

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  • Modern debates over free speech rage on the internet, but what do experts say?
  • Some think it is easy to go too far in limiting public debate by offending parties, others argue limits are part of normal discourse.
  • While the debate isn't settled, these thinkers can give you some starting points for your next discussion.
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