How Your Mental State Affects Your Experience of Time

How we remember time is vastly different to how we experience it, says neuroscientist Dean Buonomano.

Time is objective—except between your ears, says neuroscientist Dean Buonomano. Each of us intuitively feels what has been written about since at least 1890, in William James' 'The Principles of Psychology': a warping of our internal clock that is inconsistent with the notion of time as a constant force. Here, Buonomano explains our paradoxical experience of time. In the moment, pleasure is fleeting, while pain and boredom seem to last forever. But that's just one way our brain interprets time: prospectively. In the opposite view, retrospective timing, the tables are turned, and the good times are rebuilt to hold much more weight in our memory while that six-hour delay at the airport fades into oblivion. How we remember time is vastly different to how we experience it. Dean Buonomano is the author of Your Brain Is a Time Machine: The Neuroscience and Physics of Time.

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Hey Bill Nye! Is the Multiverse a Paradoxical Idea?

The Many Worlds Interpretation is just one of a few multiverse hypotheses—but is there a glaring paradox in this popular idea?

The idea of a multiverse as we conceive of it was first mentioned by Nobel Prize-winning Austrian physicist Erwin Schrödinger in 1952, who warned a lecture hall full of people that this may "seem lunatic", but perhaps his equations did not show mere alternative versions of history, but alternatives all happening simultaneously. For this week's question, Austin wants to know about the multiverses paradox: if every alternate timeline happens, and anything that can happen does—somewhere—then wouldn't there be a universe that could not support the idea of any other universe existing? All multiverse hypothesis are as yet unverified by experiments, so it's all up in the air. But if we ever want to find out, the way to do it is by supporting space exploration, because the more we find out about the cosmos, the closer we get to knowledge about our own origins and the greater our capacity grows for multiverse experimentation. Bill Nye's most recent book is Unstoppable: Harnessing Science to Change the World.

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Neil deGrasse Tyson Explains the Strange Paradoxes of Time Travel

Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson explains the nature of time and the conundrums of time travel in a recent interview.

Fresh snow fallen on the clock park, a sculpture by artist Klaus Rinke made of 24 station clocks, in Duesseldorf, western Germany, on March 7, 2016. (Photo credit: MAJA HITIJ/AFP/Getty Images)

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The Life and Death of Schrodinger's Cat, and What It Really Means.

Schrodinger's cat is one of the most famous thought experiments of all time, but what does it mean for science, and what happens to the poor cat?

If you feel the need to put this cat in a box, you might be a physicist.

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