Self-Motivation
David Goggins
Former Navy Seal
Career Development
Bryan Cranston
Actor
Critical Thinking
Liv Boeree
International Poker Champion
Emotional Intelligence
Amaryllis Fox
Former CIA Clandestine Operative
Management
Chris Hadfield
Retired Canadian Astronaut & Author
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Adult-made neurons mature longer, have unique functions

Unraveling the mysteries of adult neurogenesis may have clinical applications.

  • Neuroscientists don't know the degree to which adult human brains generate new neurons.
  • A new study found that adult-born neurons in lab rats continued to grow and mature long after infant-born ones stopped.
  • Understanding the process of neuron birth and death can help scientists understand the causes of neurological disorders.

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Should you "hack" your sleep pattern?

Living like a genius and finding ways to "optimize" sleep is not necessarily good for your health. Here's why.

  • A seemingly common trait of geniuses like Nikola Tesla and Leonardo da Vinci is that they operated (and excelled) on very few hours of sleep per night. BrainCraft's Vanessa Hill explains that while unorthodox sleep patterns may have worked for them, your mileage may vary. Attempting to sleep like a genius could "wreak havoc" on your brain and be detrimental to your health.
  • There are three different types of sleep patterns: monophasic sleep (one chunk at night for a recommended 6-8 hours), biphasic sleep (two chunks in a 24-hour period), and polyphasic sleep (three or more chunks in a 24-hour period). While sleeping, you cycle through four stages: two light, one deep, and one REM.
  • Switching sleep patterns can disrupt these stages, as can consuming alcohol. So while attempting to maximize your creative time, you may be denying your brain and body the time it needs to recover, which can be dangerous.

Inside the brains of psychopaths

Three scientists examine three dimensions of psychopathy: neurological, social, and criminal.

  • How are the brains of psychopaths wired differently? In this video, psychologist Kevin Dutton, neuroscientist (and psychopath himself) James Fallon, and professor of psychiatry Michael Stone take the wiring apart.
  • In neurotypical people, the amygdala and the orbitofrontal cortex inhibit one another to allow for reasonable, moral decision-making. Psychopaths don't have that mechanism.
  • Up to 80% of who a psychopath will turn out to be is down to environment. Intelligence, natural aggressiveness, and your family and friends determine whether a psychopath will grow up to make a killing or just "make a killing in the market," as a famous headline once said.
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How dopamine drives brain activity

A specialized MRI sensor reveals the neurotransmitter's influence on neural activity throughout the brain.

Matt Cardy/Getty Images

Using a specialized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sensor, MIT neuroscientists have discovered how dopamine released deep within the brain influences both nearby and distant brain regions.

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How does hypnosis really impact the brain?

A groundbreaking Stanford University study explains the areas of the brain that are impacted by hypnosis.

Photo by LILAWA.COM on Shutterstock
  • Hypnosis refers to a trance state that is characterized by extreme suggestibility, relaxation, and heightened imagination.
  • According to a Stanford University School of Medicine study, there are three areas of our brains that change during a state of hypnosis.
  • This groundbreaking study provides information on how hypnosis impacts the brain, which could lead to new and improved pain management and anxiety treatments in the future.
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