The Mystery of a Boy Who Lost the Vision Center of His Brain But Can Still See 7 Years Later

The case of a 7-year-old Australian boy who was supposed to lose sight at two weeks old but can still see has stunned scientists.

Credit: Inaki-Carril Mundinano, Juan Chen, Mitchell de Souza, Marc G. Sarossy, Marc F. Joanisse, Melvyn A. Goodale, James A. Bourne.

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Scientists Dose "Mini-Brains" with a Psychedelic Drug to Understand How It Works

It’s the 1st observed psychedelic-caused molecular changes inside human neural tissue.

Neural organoid or “mini-brain.” Credit: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

In the Americas, shamans in pre-Columbian societies used psychedelic substances to help cultivate wisdom, gain insights, and commune with the divine. According to new research, such substances may help in more clinical ways. They could be used to treat depression, anxiety, PTSD, and other psychiatric disorders.

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Being busy is killing our ability to think creatively

Here's why you should try to fit less—not more—into each day.

The other day a friend mentioned that he’s looking forward to autonomous cars, as it will help lower the accident and fatality rates caused by distracted driving. True, was my initial reply, with a caveat: what we gain on the roads we lose in general attention. Having yet another place to be distracted does not add to our mental and social health. 

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Do Creative People Really See the World Differently?

That's a big yes, as an incredible new study from University of Melbourne researchers found.

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How the Ancient 'Method of Loci' Can Improve Your Long-Term Memory

A study finds that just 30 minutes of memory training per day, for 40 days, can reorganize your brain connectivity.

The temporal lobe (orange) is involved with smell and sound, the processing of speech and vision, and plays a key role in the formation of long-term memory.

Life would be a lot sweeter if you were a memory athlete. From the small details like where you put your keys, to the more important matters like PIN codes, trivia nights, and work-specific information recall, you would be set for success. Most of us however, are not wired that way. But don't be discouraged: thanks to neuroplasticity, anyone can transcend their fallible memory. What you're born with isn't what you're stuck with. 

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