4 microbes may lead to new type 2 diabetes probiotics

A new study suggests that maintaining gut health to avoid diabetes may be little simpler than previously believed.

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  • Four out of trillions of gut microbes have been identified as being especially important for health.
  • The microbes may play a role in obesity that can result in type 2 diabetes.
  • Understanding the microbes' roles may lead to new probiotics for preventing and treating type 2 diabetes.
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6 things science is revealing about your skin and hygiene

Unfortunately, "less is better" is not a catchy marketing slogan.

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  • For his new book, "Clean: The New Science of Skin," physician James Hamblin didn't shower for five years.
  • Soap is a relatively simple concoction; you're mostly paying for marketing and scent.
  • While hygiene is important, especially during a pandemic, Hamblin argues that we're cleaning too much.
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New tardigrade species withstands lethal UV radiation thanks to fluorescent 'shield'

Another amazing tardigrade survival skill is discovered.

Credit: Suma et al., Biology Letters (2020)
  • Apparently, some water bears can even beat extreme UV light.
  • It may be an adaptation to the summer heat in India.
  • Special under-skin pigments neutralize harmful rays.
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Earth’s first lifeforms breathed arsenic, not oxygen

The microbes that eventually produced the planet's oxygen had to breathe something, after all.

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  • We owe the Earth's oxygen to ancient microbes that photosynthesized and released it into the world's oceans.
  • A long-standing question has been: Before oxygen, what did they breathe?
  • The discovery of microbes living in a hostile early-Earth-like environment may provide the answer.
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Coronavirus aggressively invades lung cells in chilling new images

The images were published in the New England Journal of Medicine and show how prolific coronavirus can become in a mere four days.

  • COVID-19 is a respiratory disease that spreads through human airways.
  • New images taken with a scanning electron microscope show coronavirus swarming over bronchial cells.
  • The images further stress the importance of preventative measures such as handwashing and wearing a mask in public.
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