Supercentenarian DNA May Hold the Ultimate Secret to Longevity

Find the right genes and we’ll have a way to prolong life and good health, perhaps indefinitely.

Credit: Getty Images.

Better food, healthcare, working conditions, and safety protocols have allowed humans to live longer and healthier than ever before. In most developed countries today, the average lifespan is 80 years, while in 1906, a little more than 100 years ago, it was 48. Projections moving forward look so good that there’s a debate in the medical community on whether or not we can increase human longevity indefinitely.

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A temporary marriage makes more sense than marriage for life

Most marriages end in resentment. Why should longevity be the sole marker of a successful marriage?


 

 

Angelina Jolie Pitt and Brad Pitt attend the WSJ Magazine 2015 Innovator Awards on November 4, 2015. (Photo by Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for WSJ)

In November 1891, the British sexologist Havelock Ellis married the writer and lesbian Edith Lees. He was 32 and a virgin. And since he was impotent, they never consummated their union. After their honeymoon, the two lived separately in what he called an open marriage. The union lasted until Lees’ death in 1916. 

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Studies Reveal If Humans Can Live Forever

New studies look at possible age limits to the human lifespan.

Credit: Pixabay

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Can the Human Lifespan Be Extended Indefinitely?

One controversial study claims to have found the edge of the human lifespan. 

Misao Okawa, the world's oldest Japanese woman looks on her 116th birthday celebration on March 5, 2014 in Osaka, Japan. (Photo by Buddhika Weerasinghe/Getty Images)

Do you want to live forever? There’s a controversy within the scientific community if such a thing will ever be possible. In fact, it might even be that we’ve hit the limit of the human lifespan already. Since the 19th century, improvements in public health and diet, the development of modern medicine, a decrease in the infant mortality rate, the decline of smoking, and other advancements in health, have seen the human lifespan elongate dramatically. But is there a ceiling? That depends on whom you ask.   

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