Can You Fix a Broken Heart by Writing about It?

Break-ups can be bad for your health. But new research shows that writing about your separation can improve cardiac health—as long as you write in a certain way. 

Writing in our diary may be good for our heart, quite literally.

Going through a separation, a divorce, or even just a bad break-up can feel earth shattering and soul destroying. As if this wasn't enough, separating from your loved one can also wreak havoc on your health.

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Entrepreneurs: Stop Fetishizing Failure, Start Asking Absurd Questions

Silicon Valley's entrepreneurial trends go through births and deaths, revolutionizing business attitudes before turning stale. Tim Ferris explains two trends: one near its death, the other very much alive and kicking.

There are two start-up trends that are sweeping Silicon Valley and beyond: one, says Tim Ferriss, needs to be redefined, and the other needs to be more widely activated. The first has gained so much popularity it has become a motto: "fail fast, fail forward". Ferriss is concerned that we’re fetishizing failure as something harmless that only leads upwards, when in reality in some industries it can be quite deadly. The second is the practice of absurd questions. Billionaire investor Peter Thiel will look at a business plan and say to its creator: "Why can't you accomplish your ten-year plan in the next six months?" Asking seemingly crazy questions, and setting hypothetical limits (such as, "how would you hit your goal in the same time by working only 2 hours per week?"), forces divergent thinking and can prompt you to actually do what once seemed unthinkable. Tim Ferriss is the author of Tools of Titans: The Tactics, Routines, and Habits of Billionaires, Icons, and World-Class Performers.

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