The science of successful things: Star Wars, Steve Jobs, and Google’s epic fail

So, how do you make something popular? Simple! You just update something old. This applies to storytelling, design, and even tech gadgets.

So, how do you make a product successful? You make it out of something old. The Atlantic editor Derek Thompson gives a more studious explanation of this answer as he poses the question: why did Google Glass fail and why is the iPhone the most profitable product in human history? Poor design comes to mind, but the answer, Thompson suggests, is much deeper than that. Both were wild new inventions, but Google Glass ultimately failed because it looked like a prototype and not at all like any product that consumers had ever seen before. It seemed alien, and that was a bad thing. Butt the iPhone, on the other hand, is merely a design update of the iPod. Consumers already understood how to work it before they even picked it up, and therefore buyers already knew what they were in for. It's this familiarity itself that is the selling point, as this logic applies to the world of storytelling, too. Derek explains the "hero journey" similarities between Star Wars, The Odyssey, and... The Bible. Derek Thompson's latest book is Hit Makers: The Science of Popularity in an Age of Distraction.

There Are "Two Halves" To Great Design, Says iPod Co-Designer

Anyone can develop a great eye for design, according to the designer who led the team that created the iPod.

Eilsariva via pixabay

Posting and discussing examples of bad design has recently become a curiously popular online hobby. The subreddit r/crappydesign, perhaps the mecca of ridiculing design faux pas, boasts nearly 700,000 subscribers and features posts like an elevator with completely unordered buttons and a height chart that's placed several feet off the ground. (r/crappydesign's motto, for the record, is: "MAY THE COMIC SANS AND LENS FLARES FLOW UNFILTERED}".)

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