How one NY hospital system treated 128,000+ COVID cases

From making their own swabs to staying in constant communication across the board, Northwell Health dove headfirst into uncharted waters to take on the virus and save lives.

  • Preparing for a pandemic like COVID-19 was virtually impossible. Northwell Health president and CEO Michael Dowling explains how, as the largest healthcare provider in New York, his team had to continuously organize, innovate, and readjust to dangerous and unpredictable conditions in a way that guaranteed safety for the staff and the best treatment for over 128,000 coronavirus patients.
  • From making their own supplies when they ran out, to coordinating with government at every level and making sense of new statistics and protocols, Northwell focused on strengthening internal and external communication to keep the ship from sinking.
  • "There was no such thing as putting up the white flag," Dowling says of meeting the pandemic head on and reassuring his front line staff that they would be safe and have all the resources they needed to beat the virus. "It's amazing how innovative you can be in a crisis."
Keep reading Show less

Wireless brain-to-brain communication steps closer to human trials

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) recently issued $8 million in follow-up funding to a team of neuroengineers developing brain-to-brain and brain-to-machine technology.

Credit: Rice University
  • Brain-to-machine interfaces have existed for years, but wireless and non-invasive interfaces aren't yet precise enough to be useful in real-world applications.
  • In experiments on insects, a team at Rice University has successfully used light and magnetic fields to both read and write brain activity.
  • The team hopes to use the technology to restore vision to the blind, while DARPA hopes to use brain-machine interfaces on the battlefield.
Keep reading Show less

NASA is destroying this iconic launcher platform (and no one wants the parts)

NASA is scrapping its Apollo-era launcher platform to make room for new infrastructure that will support upcoming Artemis missions.

Credit: NASA
  • NASA's Mobile Launcher Platform-2 supported the launches of historic Apollo missions, including two crewed missions to the Moon.
  • The space agency is in the process of deconstructing the platform to make space for its new Space Launch System (SLS).
  • NASA's Artemis program aims to launch three missions, including a crewed mission to the lunar surface in 2024.
Keep reading Show less

Capsaicin, the chemical in spicy peppers, used to boost solar cell performance

Can biomaterials help finally thrust perovskite solar cells to mainstream adoption?

Credit: Pixabay
  • Perovskite solar cells are an emerging type of solar technology that's more efficient than current photovoltaic technologies, but hasn't yet been adopted due to problems related to cost and stability.
  • In a recent study, scientists treated perovskite solar cells with small amounts of capsaicin, finding that the compound improved both stability and efficiency.
  • In 2022, a British startup plans to bring perovskite solar cells to market for the first time.
Keep reading Show less

Telehealth will save lives—for as long as it has funding

The federal government and private insurers greatly increased Americans' telehealth access during the pandemic. Will these changes be permanent?

Credit: Adobe Stock
  • When telehealth visits began skyrocketing after the pandemic began, hospitals had to increase their number of virtual appointments by magnitudes. Most did it seamlessly.
  • Big Think spoke to Dr. Martin Doerfler, senior vice president of clinical strategy and development at Northwell Health, about this transition and how it benefited patients.
  • Telehealth has proven its value during the pandemic, but it might stop evolving unless the federal government redesigns the regulatory framework so that insurers cover it and patients can afford it.
Keep reading Show less
Quantcast