Self-Motivation
David Goggins
Former Navy Seal
Career Development
Bryan Cranston
Actor
Critical Thinking
Liv Boeree
International Poker Champion
Emotional Intelligence
Amaryllis Fox
Former CIA Clandestine Operative
Management
Chris Hadfield
Retired Canadian Astronaut & Author
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Hits and misses: How neuroscience can boost your creativity

Some say that great ideas come out of thin air. Neuroscientist David Eagleman posits that perhaps all great ideas are simply built upon old ideas, because thats what fuels the creative brain.

"All ideas have a genealogy," says David Eagleman. A writer, neuroscientist, and adjunct professor at Stanford University, he's definitely clued in to what makes ideas click. He posits that the brain craves something new so much that if you give someone the same thing over and over that after a certain amount of time you'll begin to see diminished returns in excitement. But sometimes "new" isn't necessarily new at all. He points out that although the iPhone is a revolutionary product it bears heavy similarity to an invention from IBM... from two decades ago. New ideas tend to be built upon similar ones, David Eagleman says, because "what we’re doing is building on the foundations of what has come before us." David's new book is The Runaway Species: How Human Creativity Remakes the World.

Learn How to Think Like Einstein

Albert Einstein's famous thought experiments led to groundbreaking ideas.

Albert Einstein during a lecture in Vienna in 1921. Photo by F. Schmutzer.

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Neil deGrasse Tyson Explains the Strange Paradoxes of Time Travel

Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson explains the nature of time and the conundrums of time travel in a recent interview.

Fresh snow fallen on the clock park, a sculpture by artist Klaus Rinke made of 24 station clocks, in Duesseldorf, western Germany, on March 7, 2016. (Photo credit: MAJA HITIJ/AFP/Getty Images)

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Brainstorming: Is Your Mind Wild Enough to Make a Conceptual Leap?

The notion of brainstorming can sometimes elicit eye-rolls – usually because it's fundamentally misunderstood. Apple alumnus and Stanford Executive Director of Design, Bill Burnett, says we're only scratching the surface of its potential.

Brainstorming is on the endangered words list, at risk of slipping into ‘buzzword’ territory any day now – although some would argue it’s already there. That’s because everyone is doing it, but many of us don’t quite know how to. According to Bill Burnett, Executive Director of the Design Program at Stanford University, the process is fundamentally misunderstood – it’s about more than sitting in a group expecting genius to unfold. What’s missing from most brainstorming sessions is the notion that this is a skill, not a magic trick.

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Feeling Stuck? Good Ideas Hide in Plain Sight, Says Novelist Jonathan Safran Foer

Author Jonathan Safran Foer on the two surprising qualities successful writers need.

Here are two things you never thought a writer would need – agility and stamina. American author Jonathan Safran Foer (the literary talent behind works such as Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, Everything Is Illuminated, Eating Animals) knows writing and therefore he knows writer’s block. The feeling of being stuck can strike in any creative field. Safran Foer points out that often it feels like it’s because of a lack of ideas, but that's a red herring. You do have ideas, you just don’t care enough about them enough. Nothing you’re making feels important to you. You think ‘Who would want to read this?’ or ‘This will never sell.’

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