How has technology changed — and changed us — in the past 20 years?

Apple sold its first iPod in 2001, and six years later it introduced the iPhone, which ushered in a new era of personal technology.

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Just over 20 years ago, the dotcom bubble burst, causing the stocks of many tech firms to tumble.
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What the Greek classics tell us about grief and the importance of mourning the dead

The rites we give to the dead help us understand what it takes to go on living.

Photo by Stavrialena Gontzou on Unsplash

As the coronavirus pandemic hit New York in March, the death toll quickly went up with few chances for families and communities to perform traditional rites for their loved ones.

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The history of America, by and for doctors

The unfamiliar landscape of America's medical past is marked by bizarre incidents, forgotten breakthroughs and selfless sacrifice.

  • We all know Columbus, but who remembers Diego Alvarez Chanca, his doctor?
  • This map does – and it lists centuries of medical figures, events, and achievements.
  • It provides an unusual perspective on North American history… with one exception.
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Is Christianity rooted in psychedelic rituals?

In "The Immortality Key," Brian Muraresku speculates that the Eucharist could have once been more colorful.

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  • In his new book, Brian Muraresku speculates that the Christian Eucharist could be rooted in the Eleusinian Mysteries.
  • The wine and wafer of the modern ritual might have started off with a far more potent beverage.
  • In this interview with Big Think, Muraresku discusses "dying before dying" and the demonization of women by the Church.
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    What ended the Black Death, history's worst pandemic

    The bubonic plague ravaged the world for centuries, killing up to 200 million people.

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  • The Plague was the worst pandemic in history, killing up to 200 million people.
  • The disease spread through air, rats, and fleas, and decimated Europe for several centuries.
  • The pandemic eased with better sanitation, hygiene, and medical advancements but never completely disappeared.
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