How cybercrime has evolved since the pandemic hit

Opportunistic agility is running rampant among hackers and scammers.

  • McAfee's user base has been seeing an average of 375 new threats per minute during the pandemic.
  • Once everyone got situated in their home offices and their company's security teams started taking the appropriate measures, how did the attackers adjust?
  • Ransomware on cloud servers, hijack attempts on IoT gadgets and business email compromise (BEC) attacks increased in volume as well as sophistication over the course of Q3 2020.
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Popular internet scams to watch out for in 2020

Protect yourself and your personal information at all times on the internet.

Christin Hume on Unsplash
  • The internet is filled with scammers looking to steal your private information.
  • The Better Business Bureau has shared important information on the scams that are currently trending and ways that internet users can avoid them.
  • Every internet user should also consider investing in a VPN like Private Internet Access for added safety and security.
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China implanted tiny spy chips in servers used by Amazon, Apple

A new report from Bloomberg describes how Chinese subcontractors secretly inserted microchips into servers that wound up in data centers used by nearly 30 American companies.

  • A 2015 security test of a server sold by an American company found that someone in the supply chain had successfully embedded a tiny microchip on a motherboard.
  • The company that manufactured the compromised motherboard provides servers to hundreds of international clients, including NASA and the Department of Homeland Security.
  • U.S. officials linked the hardware attack to a People's Liberation Army unit, though it's unclear what, if anything, hackers have done or to what they have access.
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Don’t trust elections? How Blockchain can protect your vote

Getting your vote to where it matters can be harder and more corrupt than it should be. Could blockchain technology build a better system and rebuild people's trust?

Anyone who's walked into a voting booth and scratched their preference onto a piece of paper knows the same thing: the voting process suffers from a dire lack of technology. We put a man on the moon in 1969--why are we still voting on paper? Going digital isn't just a matter of convenience, but one of accountability—citizens the world over are increasingly losing trust in the democratic system, from miscounted votes, to denying eligible people the right to vote at all. So just how much can we digitize the act of voting? Perhaps blockchain—a public ledger technology where information is irreversibly recorded—can build a better system. Here, Internet pioneer Brian Behlendorf considers two aspects where blockchain can help, and one where it absolutely can't. Better tech can end voter discrimination at polling stations, and falsely reported totals at the state and national levels, but will we ever be able to vote on our mobile devices from the comfort of a blanket fort? Behlendorf delivers the bad news. Brian Behlendorf is the executive director of Hyperledger; for more info, visit hyperledger.org.

The Primer on Russia's "Active Measures," Its Information Warfare Strategy

KGB-era "active measures" are still being used by Russian intelligence agencies today, according to experts.

Russian President Vladimir Putin salutes officers 18 February, 2004 in Plesetsk, where he came to watch the launch of spacecraft Molnia. (Photo credit: MAXIM MARMUR/AFP

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