It's the age of automation and the robots are coming. But for what?

Discover the peril and potential of an automated robotic world.

Photo credit: Hugo Amaral/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Image
  • Journalist Andrés Oppenheimer, columnist and member of a Pulitzer Prize-winning team explores the cutting edge of automation.
  • From South Korean robot schools, Silicon valley futurist predictions and automated Japanese restaurants, this book shows us that the future of work is almost here.
  • Already replacing a growing number of workers while also creating new roles, the concept of employment is becoming even more dynamic.
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Driverless Cars Will be a Social Rather Than Technological Revolution

Driverless cars are nothing short of a revolution – not a technological revolution, but a social one, that will determine how fast we can accept, adapt and trust these new systems to change our lives.  

 

 

Driverless cars may be borne out of science fiction, but they are fast becoming realities on tomorrow's roadways. The transition from driver to robot is nothing short of a revolution. Not a technological revolution, but a social one, that will determine how fast we can accept, adapt and trust these new systems to change how and where we live, work, play and interact with each other. 

 

Japan's auto giant Nissan unveils the new robotic vehicle 'Pivo 2', equippeec with in-wheel electric motors to drive all wheels independently and to pivot its cabin at the company's headquarters in Tokyo. (Photo: YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP/Getty Images)

If you’ve sat in a new vehicle over the last decade, odds are that you’ve come into contact with a computer that assists in the act of driving. That assistance might have been as simple as a beep from the console that tells you when you’re about to back up into a light pole -- a mundane, accessory, maybe slightly annoying tool, not what anybody would put under the banner of science fiction. But that little beep is a harbinger for a coming revolution that will change the design of our cities and neighborhoods, our fundamental relationship with technology, and the way we work and live.

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