How cybercrime has evolved since the pandemic hit

Opportunistic agility is running rampant among hackers and scammers.

  • McAfee's user base has been seeing an average of 375 new threats per minute during the pandemic.
  • Once everyone got situated in their home offices and their company's security teams started taking the appropriate measures, how did the attackers adjust?
  • Ransomware on cloud servers, hijack attempts on IoT gadgets and business email compromise (BEC) attacks increased in volume as well as sophistication over the course of Q3 2020.
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Aspects of cybersecurity not to overlook when working from home

Just because your team has gone remote doesn't mean you need to be vulnerable to hacks, breaches, and scams.

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  • Prior to the COVID-19 outbreak, many enterprises had yet to contemplate a mass work-from-home scenario and were therefore unprepared to support it securely.
  • There are practical steps you can take to safeguard confidentiality and cybersecurity with a WFH workforce.
  • Applying best security practices to test for vulnerabilities, supervise access controls and password management, secure connections, and apply endpoint encryption can go a long way.

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'Misleading marketing': Zoom video meetings may not be as secure as you think

Video meetings on the popular platform don't seem to offer end-to-end encryption as advertised.

Zoom
  • Despite claims, Zoom's video and audio meetings don't support end-to-end encryption, according to a recent report from The Intercept.
  • End-to-end encryption is an especially strong form of security that, in theory, scrambles online data so that it's decipherable only to the sender and receiver.
  • Zoom also faces a class-action lawsuit after a Motherboard report showed how the platform passed on user data to third parties.

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China implanted tiny spy chips in servers used by Amazon, Apple

A new report from Bloomberg describes how Chinese subcontractors secretly inserted microchips into servers that wound up in data centers used by nearly 30 American companies.

  • A 2015 security test of a server sold by an American company found that someone in the supply chain had successfully embedded a tiny microchip on a motherboard.
  • The company that manufactured the compromised motherboard provides servers to hundreds of international clients, including NASA and the Department of Homeland Security.
  • U.S. officials linked the hardware attack to a People's Liberation Army unit, though it's unclear what, if anything, hackers have done or to what they have access.
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