Cephalopod aces 'marshmallow test' designed for eager children

The famous cognition test was reworked for cuttlefish. They did better than expected.

Credit: Hans Hillewaert via Wikicommons
  • Scientists recently ran the Stanford marshmallow experiment on cuttlefish and found they were pretty good at it.
  • The test subjects could wait up to two minutes for a better tasting treat.
  • The study suggests cuttlefish are smarter than you think but isn't the final word on how bright they are.
Keep reading Show less

Researchers announce a new state of matter: swirlons

Starling flocks, schools of fish, and clouds of insects all agree.

Credit: Fraser Morrison/Flickr
  • Scientists discover that active particles take a pass on Newton's Second Law.
  • Active particles exist in a "swirlonic" state of matter.
  • Swirlonic behavior explains some of the more dazzling natural phenomena such as starling swarms and shape-shifting schools of fish.
Keep reading Show less

Can cats teach us the meaning of life?

And if they could, would they care, asks philosopher John Gray in his new book.

Credit: New Africa / Adobe Stock
  • In "Feline Philosophy," philosopher John Gray argues that self-awareness isn't the epitome of evolution—and it leads to suffering.
  • Gray investigates Pascal, Spinoza, and Lao Tzu to understand why humans are so uncomfortable with themselves.
  • Whether or not humans aspire to become like cats, Gray says nature teaches us the lessons felines inherently know.
Keep reading Show less

New wellness center lets guests cuddle with cows

Cow cuddling is getting ever more popular, but what's the science behind using animals for relaxation?

Credit: cottonbro from Pexels
  • An Indian non-profit hopes to help people relax by giving them cuddle sessions with cows.
  • This is not the first such center where you can chill out with cattle.
  • Like other emotional support animals, the proven health benefits are limited.
Keep reading Show less

Toward a disease-sniffing device that rivals a dog’s nose

Trained dogs can detect cancer and other diseases by smell. Could a device do the same?

JOEL SAGET/AFP via Getty Images

Numerous studies have shown that trained dogs can detect many kinds of disease — including lung, breast, ovarian, bladder, and prostate cancers, and possibly Covid-19 — simply through smell. In some cases, involving prostate cancer for example, the dogs had a 99 percent success rate in detecting the disease by sniffing patients' urine samples.

Keep reading Show less
Quantcast