Why people (and chimps) throw temper tantrums

Primatologist Frans de Waal explains the primal instinct that unites humans and chimpanzees.

  • Humans throw temper tantrums when they feel frustrated, lose power, or sense a threat to their status or security.
  • Chimpanzees exhibit the same behavior; alpha male chimps who lose their status throw tantrums to elicit sympathy from their group, hoping to have their power restored.
  • But that tactic almost never works, notes primatologist Frans de Waal. An important lesson for humans from chimps.
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Crowd power: How online intensity wiped out traditional politics

Democrats are wondering how to beat Trump. The only way might be to play his game.

The election of Donald J. Trump surprised many, most of all the Democrats. Jeremy Heimans, a political activist and the Founder of the online media company Purpose, explains it simply: Donald Trump won the internet, and thus won the presidency. Heimans is a political activist and the Founder of the online media company Purpose, explains it simply: Donald Trump won the internet, and thus won the presidency. It's largely the same way the NRA stays in the public eye: through dominating the conversation. Trump and the NRA, for all their foibles, are both masters at what Heimans calls "New Power" — being able to seize the moment and keep people talking — and anyone attempting to beat him needs to become a master at it, too. Jeremy's new book is the highly recommended New Power: How Power Works in Our Hyperconnected World-and How to Make It Work for You.

Obama Speaks At Hate Crimes Prevention Act Enactment (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

People get angry for all sorts of reasons, from the trivial ones (someone cut me off on the highway) to the really serious ones (people keep dying in Syria and nobody is doing anything about it). But, mostly, anger arises for trivial reasons. That’s why the American Psychological Association has a section of its website devoted to anger management. Interestingly, it reads very much like one of the oldest treatises on the subject, On Anger, written by the Stoic philosopher Lucius Annaeus Seneca back in the first century CE.

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A lesson in power, significance, and influence from Abraham Lincoln

It wasn't until after President Lincoln's death that we would discover one of his most important lessons, hidden in his desk drawer.

Want to be one of the greatest leaders of all time, with a wealth of success, power and respect? Try doing nothing for a change, says Harvard historian Nancy Koehn. This counterintuitive advice applies to moments of crisis, when the stakes are high and emotions are tense, because that is the very time when you're apt to make errors in your decision-making. Anger brings weakness, but you can conquer the trap of emotion by removing yourself from the situation, and sitting in silence to think. To prove that doing nothing in times of severe anger is a leadership skill worth developing, Koehn tells the story of the most important letter Abraham Lincoln never sent—if he had had email or twitter (i.e. quick reactions) back in 1863, the outcome of the Civil War and U.S. history may have been drastically different. It turns out you can win almost any fight if you learn how to respond thoughtfully in time, instead of reacting rashly in an instant. Nancy Koehn is the author of Forged in Crisis: The Power of Courageous Leadership in Turbulent Times .

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How to cultivate patience and tame your anger

If you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen. But if you're a Michelin Star chef with a restaurant to run, you're going to need a better coping strategy.

If you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen. But if that's not an option, you're going to need a better coping strategy. For Michelin Star chef Eric Ripert, discovering the philosophy of Buddhism and meditating daily transformed him from a raging, plate-smashing chef, to a calm and collected leader. The culinary industry is trying to rectify its reputation for workplace abuse and make kitchens a more mentally healthy environment to work in. For Ripert, the teachings of Buddhism inspired him to change the way he reacted to stress and frustration—but it's really just the framework: he recommends finding the philosophy that works for you and can guide you to become a better and more accountable person. Eric Ripert's most recent book is 32 Yolks: From My Mother's Table to Working the Line