Autonomous killer robots may have already killed on the battlefield

A brief passage from a recent UN report describes what could be the first-known case of an autonomous weapon, powered by artificial intelligence, killing in the battlefield.

STM
  • Autonomous weapons have been used in war for decades, but artificial intelligence is ushering in a new category of autonomous weapons.
  • These weapons are not only capable of moving autonomously but also identifying and attacking targets on their own without oversight from a human.
  • There's currently no clear international restrictions on the use of new autonomous weapons, but some nations are calling for preemptive bans.
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New AI-based theory explains your weird dreams

Dreams are weird. According to a new theory, that's what makes them useful.

  • A new paper suggests that dreaming helps us generalize our experiences so that we can adapt to new circumstances.
  • Therefore, the strangeness of dreams is what makes them useful.
  • This idea is supported by some data, though new experiments could help confirm it.
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MIT artificial intelligence tech can generate 3D holograms in real-time

A new method could make holograms for virtual reality, 3D printing, and more. You can even run it can run on a smartphone.

TOSHIFUMI KITAMURA/AFP via Getty Images

Despite years of hype, virtual reality headsets have yet to topple TV or computer screens as the go-to devices for video viewing.

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Playlist privacy: You can be identified from just three songs

Companies can identify you from your music preferences, as well as influence and profit from your behavior.

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  • New research discovered that you can be identified from just three song choices.
  • This type of information can be exploited by streaming services through targeted advertising.
  • The researchers are calling for musical preference to be considered in regulations regarding online privacy.
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Algorithm is 88% accurate at spotting dementia in how a person drives

New machine-learning algorithms from Columbia University detect cognitive impairment in older drivers.

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  • Driving a car is a complex activity that involves perceptual and motor skills.
  • Newly developed algorithms can identify cognitive problems in older drivers based on their driving habits with 88% accuracy.
  • The machine learning algorithms incorporate both driving behaviors and demographic information.
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