Lifestyle Changes, Not a Magic Pill, Can Reverse Alzheimer’s

The prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease is expected to triple over the next three decades, to nearly 14 million in the United States alone. 

Gerson Sobel, 93, of Rockville Center, New York swims his morning laps at the Freeport Recreation Center in New York. (Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images)

Last summer, a research group from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) quietly published the results of a new approach in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. What they found was striking. Although the size of the study was small, every participant demonstrated such marked improvement that almost all were found to be in the normal range on testing for memory and cognition by the study’s end. Functionally, this amounts to a cure.

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Your Mind Isn’t Confined to the Inside of Your Skull

Where is your mind? Professor Daniel Siegel answers this question with a more revolutionary one: Where isn't your mind?

Back in 1988, Pixies asked the catchy question: "Where is my mind?". Now, nearly 30 years later, UCLA psychiatry professor Daniel Siegel has a revolutionary answer. We’ve come to accept that the brain is the instrument that plays the mind, but Siegel takes it one step further by positing that your mind isn’t limited to the confines of your skull, or even the barrier of your skin anywhere in your body. Your mind is emergent – it’s beyond your physiology, and it exists in many different places at once. Daniel Siegel's most recent book is Mind: A Journey to the Heart of Being Human.

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Depression, Serotonin, and the Mind-Gut Connection

Neuroscientists now think of the gut as a "second brain"; it independently controls your digestive processes and is in constant conversation with your main brain. What do they talk about? Depression, theorizes Dr Emeran Mayer.

We all feel things in our gut – intuitions that give us subtle physiological alerts, stress and anxiety that unsettle us, bad reactions to food, and conversely feelings of contentment from the right food, or flutters from an exciting experience. But according to Dr Emeran Mayer, what we feel is just a small fraction of what’s going on in a region of our body that is still quite mysterious – even to the experts.

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Why a Healthy Lifestyle Won't Help Certain People Live Longer

Researchers at UCLA have found Grim Reaper DNA in 5% of the population. But there is a bright side – lifestyle choices go a long way in overriding a shorter genetic life expectancy. 

Veteran marathon runner Noel Bresland attempts to run a marathon on a treadmill inside a capsule of the famous London Eye in central London.

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UCLA Scientists "Jump-start" the Brain of a Coma Patient

UCLA researchers successfully use a new technique to "wake up" a patient after coma.

A new ultrasound treatment by UCLA scientists was used to restart brain activity in a 25-year-old man recovering from a coma. Before the treatment, the man showed few signs of consciousness and understanding speech, able to perform very limited movements. Three days after the treatment, the man could fully understand language, communicated by nodding his head and even fist-bumped one of the doctors.

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